‘Seaside Summer’ Hard of Hearing Pin Is Now Available

CIMG4265 Jul 17 2020 boat in water

Island landscape showing boats near the seashore.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

June 11, 2021.  Last summer, as Annie Lee MacDonald and I were driving along the south shore of the Island, we passed by one beautiful view after another.  Of course I always have my camera handy and love taking photos of our beautiful Island.

I was brought up on the prairies, so a seaside vista was not a normal sight.  But we spent our summers at a beach on Lake Winnipeg, and I find water views relaxing and a reminder of those lazy, carefree summer days.   

The original photo seen above was one that both Annie Lee and I agreed should be a contender for Hear PEI’s Island themed pins.  ‘Seaside Summer’ hard of hearing pin is now available, and can be ordered here: https://form.jotform.com/201983720272252.    

Seaside Summer HOH pin

‘Seaside Summer’ hard of hearing pin.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Please don’t forget to wear a hard of hearing pin when you are out and about, running your errands.  Wearing a pin not only provides visibility and lets others know we may not hear or comprehend what is being said, it is a measure of courtesy to those who may not know us.  It also provides awareness to businesses and services that currently ignore the fact that many clients, customers, and patients have hearing loss.

Do you have an experience or tip to share? Send an email to hearpei@gmail.com, comment on the blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

Screenshot_2021-02-25 Hear PEI Association

Did you know that you can subscribe to the Hear PEI Association Channel on YouTube?  Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrDqwG4tu2mmja5HwZJS3VQ

© Daria Valkenburg

A Tale Of Two Zoom Meetings

CIMG5109 Mar 26 2021 Zoom

Captioning is now available for Zoom meetings.  (Photo credit: Pieter Valkenburg)

June 2, 2021. National AccessAbility Week in Canada highlights disability inclusion and accessibility.  Readers of this blog are already aware that promoting hearing accessibility awareness and providing tips and tools for living and thriving with hearing loss are its focus.

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Last time the topic was choosing headphones that help protect your ears.  (Missed the posting?  See here: https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/2021/05/31/your-choice-of-headphones-can-help-protect-your-ears/)

This time, I’d like to discuss virtual meetings.  Since Covid-19 and the resulting pandemic safety measures, almost all of us have participated in a virtual meeting, whether by Zoom or another provider.

Thumbs down….Thumbs down on Zoom Meeting #1…..

A while ago, I participated in two Zoom meetings.  The first was with a local non-profit health organization.  I didn’t have high expectations as this was the same group that a few years ago saw no reason why they needed microphones for a public meeting.  (See https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/2018/04/17/what-a-difference-a-microphone-would-have-made/)

This time there was a microphone on the table, but it was centrally placed and it was not easy to hear all of the speakers.  Providing a microphone for each speaker at the table would have helped, or having each speaker move towards the microphone. 

The non-profit group outsourced organizing the Zoom meeting, so it is a shame that no advice was given about the microphone, nor did the paid meeting organizer activate the real-time captioning option to allow viewers with hearing loss to follow the discussion with the help of captioning.

Thumbs downI ended up leaving the Zoom meeting before it was finished and gave it thumbs down for accessibility.

….Captioning is available on Zoom….

The live transcribe and captioning options have always been available on paid versions of Zoom.  However, many of us use Zoom’s free version, particularly since social distancing measures came into place due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

At first, captioning was not available on the free version of Zoom, but after a petition began and received over 80,000 signatures, captioning can be added to a free account upon request.  (Here is the link to the request form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSccQQ2W-K8naaltkBIbuv6BfJvisy0NZS2qWIKd0gSMUWGGpQ/viewform)

At present, the captioning option can ONLY be activated by the meeting organizer, but sometime in the fall of 2021, Zoom will make this option available to all users.   (You can read more at Zoom’s support page here: https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/207279736-Closed-captioning-and-live-transcription)

Thumbs up ….Thumbs up on Zoom Meeting #2…..

CIMG5110 March 26 2021 Zoom

Jane and I test out the captioning on Zoom.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Jane Scott set up her free account and requested that the captioning option be added to her account. Once it was activated we immediately tested it.  Once the meeting organizer activates the captioning, it’s available for all participants in the Zoom call. 

Jane’s reaction mirrored mine:  “…Wowzaa — it worked pretty darn well….

The trick is that the meeting organizer MUST activate the captioning option each time.  This means that meetings can be held with or without the captioning activated, depending on the circumstances.  If captioning is activated, you also have the option of printing out a transcript of the discussion, which can be very useful if you need a written record of what was discussed.

CIMG5136 Apr 22 2021 Zoom

Look for the CC/Live Transcript button on the bottom of your screen and click to activate it.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Thumbs upNot only did I give a thumbs up for this meeting, I asked Tech Support (ie my husband) to set me up with a free Zoom account of my own so that I could organize a meeting.  Once that was set up I also applied for captioning to be added to my account.  Within 48 hours it was activated.

Naturally, Jane and I had another meeting to test out how well I did as the meeting organizer.  For this non-techie person it worked beautifully.

Is the real-time captioning perfect?  No, but it’s very good and much better than sitting in a virtual meeting and having no idea what someone said.

Thank you to Jane Scott for her advice on the Zoom captioning trials and step-by-step instructions on what to do!  If you have a Zoom meeting scheduled, and have hearing loss, ask the meeting organizer to activate the real-time captioning so that the session is more accessible.

If you are the meeting organizer, please ask your meeting participants if they need the real-time captioning activated.  Make your virtual meetings as hearing accessible as possible!

Do you have an experience with virtual meetings to share? Send an email to hearpei@gmail.com, comment on the blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

Screenshot_2021-02-25 Hear PEI Association

Did you know you can subscribe to the Hear PEI Association Channel on YouTube?  Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrDqwG4tu2mmja5HwZJS3VQ

© Daria Valkenburg

Your Choice Of Headphones Can Help Protect Your Ears

20210530_152619 May 30 2021 Pieter with bone conduction headphones

Like to listen to music while you run or walk? Traffic safety and protection of your ears against eardrum damage are important issues. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

May 31, 2021.  This is National AccessAbility Week in Canada. It’s great that a week is dedicated to highlight disability inclusion and accessibility!  Readers of this blog are already aware that promoting hearing accessibility awareness and providing tips and tools for living and thriving with hearing loss are my focus.  As well, it’s the focus of all Hear PEI activities.

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With summer weather upon us, more people are listening to music while running, walking, or just working outside.  If you are still using traditional headphones or earbuds, consider switching to bone conduction headphones. Why? Unlike traditional headphones or earbuds, bone conduction headphones deliver sound through your cheekbones, and you don’t risk damaging your eardrums.

20210530_152719 May 30 2021 Pieter with bone conduction headphone closeup

Bone conduction headphones deliver sound through the cheekbones, and don’t damage your eardrums. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

From a traffic safety point of view, one essential point of bone conduction headphones is that you are aware of your surroundings.  Because your ears are not blocked, you can hear traffic noises.

Eardrum protection and traffic safety were top of mind for us as my husband loves to run.  In our neighbourhood there aren’t dedicated spaces for running, so he must always be aware of his surroundings, particularly from traffic.

Living with a person with hearing loss made him conscious of the need to protect his own hearing, and so he began looking for headphones that would do double duty in safety and protection.

While no headphone will PREVENT hearing loss, you can choose a headphone to mitigate potential damage.  If you wear a hearing aid, you may appreciate a device that lets your ears be headphone free.

Last year I reported on his search for the ideal bone conduction headphones, which you can read here: https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/2020/02/09/be-kind-to-your-valentine/

20210530_153204 May 30 2021 Aftershokz headphones

My husband likes his Aftershokz bone conduction headphones. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

A year later, he’s still happy with his choice of bone conduction headphones.  “… I can hear perfectly, and they don’t slip or move while I run...” he explained.  “…The headphones work through Bluetooth technology with my Mp3 player, which means I have no wires to attach.  I can keep my player in my pocket or clip it on my shirt, whichever I prefer, and I have the same quality of sound

One thing I noticed is that the sound volume isn’t turned up as high when he uses these headphones as when he used earbuds, an unexpected outcome.

Music device reviewer and tech enthusiast Adarsh P. shared a comprehensive article he wrote about preventing hearing loss from headphones, which you can read here:  https://www.swingvertigo.com/prevent-hearing-loss-from-headphones/.

As so many musicians have hearing loss, I asked him if bone conduction headphones are useful for musicians as well.  His response was “…I agree that bone conduction headphones are a practical choice for musicians...

I’m reminded of avid guitarist Mike Smith’s story of hearing loss, as shared a while ago, when he spoke about his hearing loss after years of exposure to loud music. Perhaps bone conduction headphones would have made a difference if available back then.  See https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/2018/10/05/do-you-wish-you-had-listened-to-your-parents/

Thank you to Pieter Valkenburg for sharing his experience with bone conduction headphones, and to Adarsh P. for sharing his article on preventing hearing loss from headphones.

Do you have an experience with headphones to share? Send an email to hearpei@gmail.com, comment on the blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

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A hard of hearing pin is a simple and courteous way to let others know that you have hearing loss.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

If you are running or walking outdoors, and have hearing loss, consider wearing a hard of hearing pin to help bring awareness of hearing loss issues, and as a courtesy to those you meet who may not be aware that you don’t have perfect hearing.  Don’t have a hard of hearing pin?  You can order one here: https://form.jotform.com/201983720272252

Screenshot_2021-02-25 Hear PEI Association

Did you know you can subscribe to the Hear PEI Association Channel on YouTube?  Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrDqwG4tu2mmja5HwZJS3VQ

© Daria Valkenburg

‘I Can’t Hear You Doctor’ Now On YouTube

CIMG4553 Oct 23 2020 South Shore Clinic Pieter and Joan

Pieter Valkenburg reprises the role of doctor.  Joan Dawson is the patient in ‘I Can’t Hear You Dr’.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

May 19, 2021.  Season 2 of Hear PEI videos has its sixth entry up on the Hear PEI Association YouTube Channel. ‘I Can’t Hear You Doctor’ follows an earlier video about some of the issues that people with hearing loss can encounter at a doctor’s office.

The pandemic has made things difficult for people with hearing loss, especially those who perhaps didn’t realize that they had hearing loss, until people had their faces covered with masks.  We don’t realize how much we all rely on speechreading techniques and facial expressions in our daily communications.

When you go to your doctor’s office, you want to make sure that you get the most out of your visit.  The dramatization in the video is based on feedback that we’ve received from both doctors and patients since mask wearing became a reality due to the pandemic.

Afterwards, hosts Annie Lee MacDonald and myself discuss strategies that we’ve learned for a better interaction, and provide tips for medical professionals. Physician Dr Fraser McKay provides a doctor’s perspective on the challenges faced.

This fully captioned video was made possible with funding from the Seniors Secretariat of PEI, and can be watched here:

….Initial feedback…..

Brien Robertson wrote that My brother has a mild hearing loss. Having been with him for various doctor visits it seems like the only accommodations they make is talking louder. It seems like his chart should be flagged accordingly. It also appears that with hearing loss people assume you are simple. Clear masks are a must. I think medical training should have a little more focus on communicating with people with a hearing loss….” Brien has raised a number of important points that hopefully will be taken into consideration by the medical community.

Cheryl Carpenter noted that “…Well done!  “Louder is not clearer!” How true! Our Special Services for Students helped teachers be keenly aware of that. The same applies to English as a second language students; evidently some teachers thought that talking loudly would somehow make translation easier!…” Cheryl correctly notes that communication issues are not always related to hearing loss.  Other communities can experience difficulties!

Thank you to Pieter Valkenburg and Joan Dawson for playing the roles of doctor and patient in the dramatization, and to our guest, physician Dr Fraser McKay. Heartfelt thanks to post-production editor Wendy Nattress.  Not only does Wendy edit the film, she adds in the captioning, and makes sure it is uploaded properly on Hear PEI’s YouTube Channel.

Missed seeing ‘Hearing The Doctor Can Be A Challenge’? See https://youtu.be/cXD2jELC-8c

Do you have an experience at the doctor’s office to share? Send an email to hearpei@gmail.com, comment on the blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

20210202_113819 hard of hearing buttons with leaf button

A hard of hearing pin is a simple and courteous way to let others know that you have hearing loss.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Don’t have a hard of hearing pin?  You can order one here: https://form.jotform.com/201983720272252

Screenshot_2021-02-25 Hear PEI Association

Enjoyed this video? Subscribe to the Hear PEI Association Channel on YouTube!  Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrDqwG4tu2mmja5HwZJS3VQ

© Daria Valkenburg

Smoke Detectors Designed For People With Hearing Loss

April 19, 2021.  In a few weeks, it will be May, which is Better Hearing and Speech month.  The first week of May is also Emergency Preparedness Week.  So it was good timing when a question was recently received from someone with hearing loss worried about hearing a smoke alarm.

What if I can’t hear the smoke alarm????

The question:  “I have a concern and not sure what to do. I live in an apartment and when the fire alarm goes off, unless I am in my living room, I can’t hear it. Luckily the last two times that it went off in the middle of the night it was not serious. It happened again last night. So, now I am getting concerned. Is there anything I can do? …

This is a concern shared by many of us who have hearing loss.  The good news is that there are solutions.  While the easiest may be to get a fire/smoke alarm with blinking red lights, such as are found in many hotel rooms, this is not much use if the alarm goes off in the middle of the night, while you are asleep, and your hearing aids are on a table beside you, instead of in your ears.

When this question was shared with Annie Lee MacDonald she agreed that a flashing light is not sufficient.  “…It is most important to be alerted when you are in bed so an alarm with a vibrator is most important…” she said.  Annie Lee researched the options available and two choices are below, to give you an idea what is available.

…..Smoke Detector With Vibrator To Wake You Up If You Are In Bed….

Silent Call 318Mhz Smoke Detector Kit

Silent Call 318Mhz Smoke Detector Kit (Photo courtesy of ALDS)

When this smoke detector is activated, a transmitter sends a signal (up to just over 30 metres away) to a vibrating receiver to wake you up if you are in bed.  (For more information, see https://alds.com/store/#!/Silent-Call-318Mhz-Smoke-Detector-Kit/p/46500791)

…..Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Detector With Several Ways To Alert You….

HomeAware Complete Home Alerting Solution

HomeAware Complete Home Alerting Solution (Photo courtesy of ALDS)

This alarm has a remote (wireless) doorbell and has built-in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.  If activated, an extra loud 110dB alarm, flashing strobe light, easy to read 2-inch scrolling display and a vibrating ‘bed shaker’ provide several forms of alerts.  It has a range of about 300 metres between the transmitter and the main unit.  (For more information, see https://alds.com/store/#!/HomeAware-Complete-Home-Alerting-Solution-Main-Kit/p/65639207)

‘Dial 911’ and ‘Text with 911’ Protocols

While a smoke alarm is a great idea, any emergency plan should also include registering for the ‘Dial 911’ and ‘Text with 911’ protocols, in case you ever need to call emergency services….

Pamphlet outlining protocols for Dial 911 and Text with 911 for the hard of hearing.

How do you deal with a 911 call if you have hearing loss?  What if you are the only person able to make the call?  If you have a smart phone, you have an option to call or text 911 and have the operator recognize that the person calling may not be able to hear.  For more information on the protocols available on Prince Edward Island, see https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/2017/04/12/calling-911-when-you-are-hard-of-hearing/ and https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/2017/07/06/911-for-hard-of-hearing-working-well/

Don’t Forget Your Pin and Emergency Kit!

Garden-themed ‘Hard of Hearing’ pins.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

If you must evacuate due to an emergency, it’s a good idea to have a small kit ‘ready to go’ that includes identification, medication, eyeglasses, emergency contact list, masks, etc, PLUS:

Do you have an emergency preparedness experience or tip to share? What’s in your emergency kit? Do you have a smoke alarm designed for people with hearing loss?  Email hearpei@gmail.com, comment on the blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

Did you know that you can subscribe to the Hear PEI Association Channel on YouTube?  Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrDqwG4tu2mmja5HwZJS3VQ

© Daria Valkenburg

 

 

 

‘Let’s Talk Tinnitus’ Is Now On YouTube

March 30, 2021.  Season 2 of Hear PEI videos has its fifth entry up on the Hear PEI Association YouTube Channel. ‘Let’s Talk Tinnitus is an introduction to tinnitus.  It features audiologist Dr. Heidi Eaton and pharmacist Lisa Gallant. Learn what causes tinnitus, how you can alleviate the symptoms, and hear about my experience in living with tinnitus.

Audiologist Dr Heidi Eaton guides us through the basics of tinnitus in Let’s Talk Tinnitus.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

This fully captioned video was made possible with funding from the Seniors Secretariat of PEI.  Virtual education has been so important since the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic and Hear PEI is very grateful for their support.

Recently, I read that researchers in the UK have been finding a possible link between people who have had Covid-19 and hearing loss and tinnitus as a side effect.  The recommendation is for “for further studies about the long-term effects of the disease on the auditory system….” As someone who lives with both hearing loss and tinnitus, I can attest that these are not side effects you would like to have! (You can read the entire article at https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/u-k-researchers-investigate-possible-link-between-covid-19-and-hearing-loss-1.5365623)

You can watch the video here:

Readers of this blog will be aware of the special postings done on tinnitus, including a video on Tinnitus Relaxation Therapy.  Missed those postings? Here are the links:

Thank you to audiologist Dr Heidi Eaton and pharmacist Lisa Gallant for sharing their knowledge in this video. Thank you also to the Seniors Secretariat of PEI. As always, heartfelt thanks go to post-production editor Wendy Nattress.  Not only does Wendy edit the film, she adds in the captioning, and makes sure it is uploaded properly on Hear PEI’s YouTube Channel.

If you enjoyed the video, please share it with others.  Did you know that you can subscribe to the Hear PEI Association Channel on YouTube?  Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrDqwG4tu2mmja5HwZJS3VQ

Do you have a tinnitus experience or tip to share? Send an email to hearpei@gmail.com, comment on the blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

© Daria Valkenburg

‘Herd It’ Hard of Hearing Pin Is Now Available

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Island landscape showing cows in field.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

March 28, 2021.  Last summer, as Annie Lee MacDonald and I were driving along the south shore of the Island, we discussed the need for hard of hearing pins that were in different designs.

As we passed by one beautiful view after another, we had a brainwave.  Why not include some Island views in the pins? Out came my camera and several landscape scenes were taken.

With both of us living in a rural area, where cows are part of the landscape, we thought that the first of the Island-themed hard of hearing pins should feature this familiar view.  With spring upon us, it’s a good time to let you know that the ‘Herd It’ hard of hearing pin is now available, and can be ordered here: https://form.jotform.com/201983720272252.    

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‘Herd It’ hard of hearing pin.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

I always wear my pin on a sweater, jacket, or coat.  Joan Gilliatt, however, has a pin attached to her cloth purse.  What a good idea!  Thank you for sharing this tip, Joan!

CIMG5082 bag with pin from Joan Gilliatt

Joan Gilliatt has a hard of hearing pin on her cloth purse.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Do you have an experience or tip to share? Send an email to hearpei@gmail.com, comment on the blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

Screenshot_2021-02-25 Hear PEI Association

Did you know that you can subscribe to the Hear PEI Association Channel on YouTube?  Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrDqwG4tu2mmja5HwZJS3VQ

© Daria Valkenburg

Free Webinar From Oticon Medical: Cochlear Implants And Auditory Training

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March 25, 2021.  Hear PEI is pleased to let you know about a captioned webinar presented by Oticon Medical on April 17, 2021 at 11 am ADT (Atlantic Time).  The virtual event will be conducted over Zoom, with professional live closed captioning.

When Oticon Medical contacted Hear PEI, they noted that “…the current COVID-19 precautions that we have all become accustomed to have changed the way we communicate and interact with others. As many of you know, some of these changes have made communication much more challenging for individuals with hearing loss….”  So true! 

Readers of this blog are aware that for the past year, you’ve been urged to adopt clear-window face masks so that people can see your lips and facial expressions, making speechreading possible.  If you have hearing loss yourself, wearing a pin identifying you as hard of hearing goes a long way to build awareness of hearing loss, and to make life easier for yourself and those who interact with you.  (See the order form for a selection of pins and masks: https://form.jotform.com/201983720272252)

Oticon Medical is hosting a free webinar “…to discuss recent advances in cochlear implant technology as well as offer strategies to help improve listening ability in a world dealing with COVID-19…

One of the presenters, Wendy Visser, “….an auditory skills therapist and Teacher of the Deaf, will give various techniques to improve listening quality and specifically address challenges resulting from the COVID-19 environment. If you communicate orally, Auditory Skills Training (AST) is an effective aural rehabilitation method where AST therapists show your family and friends how to use everyday scenarios to support the development or your hearing skills at home….

This sounds very interesting and I have already registered.  What about you?  If you’d like to register for Cochlear Implants & Auditory Skills Training, click here:  http://otic.one/xF9.  Once you’ve registered, please email hearpei@gmail.com and say you’ve registered.  If there is enough interest in webinar events, then Hear PEI may arrange more events.

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Do you have an experience to share on this topic? If so, please send an email to hearpei@gmail.com, comment on this blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

© Daria Valkenburg

A Sad Farewell To Duncan Cole

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March 6, 2021.  We were saddened to learn of the recent passing of Duncan Cole at the age of 89. Our condolences go out to his family. Please see his obituary for more information: http://www.davisonfh.com/obituaries/152420/

Annie Lee MacDonald noted that “…Duncan and his wife Laura were regular attendees to our meetings for years until his health worsened and they moved to Clinton Heights. He was a wonderful man…” 

If you have memories to share about Duncan, please send an email to hearpei@gmail.com, comment on this blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

© Daria Valkenburg

Garden-Themed ‘Hard of Hearing’ Pins Feature In A PSA

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Garden-themed ‘Hard of Hearing’ pins.  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

March 5, 2021.  Recently we were invited by CBC radio to do a public service announcement (PSA) on the ‘Hard of Hearing’ pins that we’ve been encouraging people with hearing loss to wear.  After looking out the window at the view of our front yard, it seemed as though all I could think about was spring.  So that became the theme around the PSA – to make more people aware of the availability of ‘Hard of Hearing’ pins with a garden-theme.

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When will spring arrive?  (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Here is the link to the PSA: https://drive.google.com/file/d/15pI_JfPbkFl20rrRpfc_PnwfHpwo-ESa/view?usp=sharing

The basic text of the PSA…..

It may not seem like it, but spring is just around the corner. Spring flowers will soon be peeping through the ground, reaching for the warmth of the sun. 

Did you know that Hear PEI has a number of gardening-themed hard of hearing pins, all with the phrase ‘Hard of Hearing’?

We have pins with lilacs, leaves, wildflowers, and the newest pin showcases tulips. 

With everyone wearing masks, wearing a hard of hearing pin is a courtesy to others, and a wonderful way to make people aware that you have hearing loss. They will make every effort to communicate effectively with you. 

Why not celebrate the season of flowers and promote hearing accessibility at the same time?  For more information, email us at hearpei@gmail.com or tweet to @HearPEI.

Fingers crossed for an early spring!  Please don’t forget to wear a hard of hearing pin when you are out and about, running your errands. Need a pin?  Here’s the link to order yours:  https://form.jotform.com/201983720272252.

Do you have an experience or tip to share? Send an email to hearpei@gmail.com, comment on the blog, or tweet to @HearPEI.

Screenshot_2021-02-25 Hear PEI Association

Did you know that you can subscribe to the Hear PEI Association Channel on YouTube?  Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrDqwG4tu2mmja5HwZJS3VQ

© Daria Valkenburg