West River United Church is Looped

LoopPEI_logo-P2

May 30, 2018.  The second church that participated in the week long Let’s Loop PEI Project, made possible due to a grant from the CHHA Foundation, was West River United Church in Cornwall, which decided to loop the entire sanctuary.  Like South Shore United Church, West River United Church had volunteers to help and they went through the same steps:

Step 1: The Field Survey

The church did its own field survey.

Step 2: The EMI Test

I did the EMI test, with assistance from Doug Aitken, who could explain any anomalies in the readings, such as where fluorescent lights were located in the basement.

Step 3: The Site Evaluation

Three volunteers participated in the site evaluation: Doug Aitken, Phil Pater, and Tom Barnes, under the watchful eye of Bill Droogendyk of Better Hearing Solutions.

CIMG0043 May 15 2018 site survey West River United Church Tom & Doug loop wires

Tom Barnes on left and Doug Aitken on right loop wires around the perimeter of the sanctuary for the temporary hearing loop. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

cimg0045-may-15-2018-site-survey-west-river-united-church-phil-with-wire.jpg

Phil Pater with the spool of wire used in the temporary loop. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

CIMG0046 May 15 2018 site survey West River United Church Bill Phil Tom

Discussing the best loop driver to be used in West River United Church. Left to right: Bill Droogendyk, Phil Pater, Tom Barnes. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Step 5:  Wiring The Sanctuary

The dedicated volunteers at West River United Church decided to wire the sanctuary a few hours after the site evaluation.  They too were very careful in making sure the job was done correctly.  The sanctuary is carpeted, and Doug Aitken explained that after the wiring was put in, hours were spent ensuring that the wires were folded under the carpet so that no wiring was exposed.  They did a brilliant job.  You can’t see any trace of wiring!

Step 6:  Hooking the Loop Driver to the Sound System

After the wiring was done, the loop driver (amplifier) was hooked to the church’s sound system and calibrated to the IEC60118 standard for a compliant hearing loop.

The official testing of the hearing loop was done during a public information session, led by Rick Burger, Chair of the Worship Committee.  Members of the congregation were invited, as were members of our Chapter, and South Shore United Church.  Two members of the PEI Seniors Secretariat attended, at our invitation, as the Secretariat had sponsored the printing of information pamphlets.

The pamphlet explains the four ways you can access a facility that has a hearing loop installed – anywhere in the world. One way is to have a hearing aid or cochlear implant with a telecoil that’s been activated.  Second, special earbuds called OTOjOY work with a free app you can download on your iPhone.  Third, you can use a hearing loop receiver with headphones or earbuds.  Lastly there is a pocket talker with a telecoil built into it.  (See The Let’s Loop PEI Project – How You Can Access An Area With A Hearing Loop for this same information.)

During the information session, people could test the hearing loop in a short program that included both speech in the form of words of welcome from the church and our Chapter, plus music with singing and piano accompaniment.

The hearing loop worked well.  The audience included people who had telecoils activated in their hearing aids, as well as people with cochlear implants with the telecoils activated.  For one man, it was the first time the telecoil had been used since he received his hearing aids. The increase in sound volume was quite a shock for someone not used to hearing well.

Those without the luxury of hearing aids or cochlear implants with telecoils activated tried the hearing loop through receivers, OTOjOY earbuds, or pocket talkers, as we had brought a selection for people to try.  Unfortunately for the people who tried the pocket talkers, they didn’t have the best experience at first due to operator error.  We’d plugged the headphones into the microphones instead of the receivers!

CIMG0082 May 18 2018 West River United Church public info session Rick Burger sings

Rick Burger sings a solo during the public information session at West River United Church. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Angela Walker of CBC Radio’s Mainstreet also attended, and afterwards interviewed a number of people.  Here is the link to the radio interview.

http://www.cbc.ca/listen/shows/mainstreet-pei/segment/15546716

Step 7:  Post Signage

The last step in the installation was to post signs advising that the hearing loop was installed.

Our thanks to the volunteers, CHHA Foundation, PEI Seniors Secretariat, and to Bill and Wilma Droogendyk of Better Hearing Solutions for making this installation possible.

Do you have an old hearing loop in your church?

Many PEI Churches were previously looped decades ago.  Several people commented that their church had an “old hearing loop” that either didn’t work, or no one knew what to do with, and asked if we could help get the hearing loops working again.  Many years ago, hearing loops had been installed by a group of volunteers, the Aliant Pioneers.  These loops were not done to international standards, because at the time there were no standards.  In some cases, the hearing loops are still in existence.  In other cases, they were torn out during renovations.

Churches in PEI with hearing loops done decades ago may wish to have their venues tested to see if they can meet the international IEC60118 standard for a compliant hearing loop. Hearing loops that meet the IEC60118 standard offer much greater sound clarity and uniform loudness throughout the looped area.

New technology for accessing the hearing loop means more people with hearing loss can benefit from a hearing loop.

Our Let’s Loop PEI story continues in the next blog posting.  You can email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on this blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI

Follow this link to our Upcoming Events page: Upcoming Events

Follow this link to places on PEI equipped with a hearing loop:  Places on PEI Equipped With A Hearing Loop

Like the work we do?  Consider a donation to help us do more.  100% of your donation stays on PEI to help Islanders.  We now have a page at the Canada Helps website:  https://www.canadahelps.org/en/dn/34708

 © Daria Valkenburg

 

 

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South Shore United Church is Looped

LoopPEI_logo-P2

May 24, 2018.  When the Let’s Loop PEI Project began, we had no idea what was needed to loop a building.  We only knew that hearing loops worked and would be of use to a number of people.  Not surprisingly, churches were receptive to the idea of a hearing loop.  Many have parishioners with hearing loss who have either stopped making the effort to come to church due to difficulties in hearing, or do come to church but are unable to follow the service.

Many churches have excellent sound amplification systems.  Sadly, for people with severe hearing loss, the best sound system still won’t help with clarity and the ability to understand what is being said. Louder doesn’t mean better!  Some churches provide copies of the sermon to those with hearing loss, others have presentations on a screen.  There had to be a better solution, thought a number of churches.

After we received a grant from the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association (CHHA) Foundation to pay the travel costs of bringing in expertise to train volunteers in how to loop their facility to an international standard IEC60118 compliant hearing loop’, we contacted a few places to gauge their interest in participating, willingness to provide volunteers to do the work under supervision, and willingness to pay the installation costs of the materials needed to loop a venue.  Bill Droogendyk of Better Hearing Solutions agreed to provide the expertise.

South Shore United Church in Tryon was willing to participate, had two volunteers – Jack Sorensen and Pieter Valkenburg – and the funding to pay their installation costs.  This posting summarizes the steps taken from conception to completion.

Step 1: The Field Survey

The church was sent a sheet in which questions about the site were asked, including the floor plan, building dimensions, building construction information, ceiling height and construction, whether seating was fixed or moveable, location of sound system, and types of microphones used.

On a cold day in March, the two volunteers and I met to complete this survey.

CIMG9889 Mar 18 2018 view of pews from stage proposed loop area is on right SSUC sanctuary

Daria Valkenburg with Jack Sorensen in South Shore United Church. (Photo credit: Pieter Valkenburg)

Step 2: The EMI Test

A test for electromagnetic interference (EMI) was next, and done twice in April.  Bill explained that “EMI is essentially noise, typically heard as a hum that just sits in the background. If it’s excessive (> -32dB), it’s annoying and causes the hearing loop installation to not comply with the IEC standard. In such cases, the loop itself would be quite fine but the facility itself fails to meet the standard.

First, Brenda Porter, whose hearing aids have activated telecoils, came and checked whether she heard any hums or other noises when the electrical equipment and sound system were turned on.  No noise, which was a good sign.

CIMG9949 Apr 10 2018 Jack and Brenda at SSUC testing T switch

Jack Sorensen with Brenda Porter during the EMI test using the telecoils in her hearing aids. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Bill sent us a device for a more accurate test of electromagnetic interference, so a few weeks later, volunteer Pieter Valkenburg tested the church.  The test confirmed Brenda’s experience of no sound interference.

cimg9975-apr-24-2018-emi-test-ssuc-pieter-in-central-aisle.jpg

Pieter Valkenburg doing EMI test at South Shore United Church. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Step 3: The Site Evaluation

In May, Bill Droogendyk arrived on the island, and did the formal site evaluation with a group of volunteers. Wires were temporarily strung in the area to be looped, while testing was done.  Bill explained that the site evaluation is “done to determine physical measurements, usage (seating arrangements), EMI, loop performance constraints (largely due to metal loss) for uniform sound volume and sound frequency – all with view on how to design an IEC60118 compliant hearing loop” Metal absorbs sound and, if not taken into account, can lead to a ‘dead zone’ for sound.

A decision was then made on the type of loop driver (amplifier) needed for the best sound.  As the church hosts a number of musical events, a loop driver capable of providing clarity for music was chosen.

CIMG0015 May 14 2018 Site survey SSUC

Pieter Valkenburg (left) and Jack Sorensen (right) loop wire between the pew rows during the site survey at South Shore United Church. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

CIMG0026 May 14 2018 Site survey SSUC

Left to right: Tom Barnes, Jack Sorensen, Bill Droogendyk, Phil Pater, Pieter Valkenburg. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Step 5:  Wiring The Sanctuary

Based on the loop design determined by the site evaluation, Jack and Pieter spent hours on the floor of the sanctuary South Shore United Church, stapling wires under pews and then burying any visible wires between the floorboards so that no wires were exposed.  By the way, if you were wondering, they made sure the staples didn’t go through the wire.  They did it right the first time.  And the wiring is basically invisible, as you can see from the photo below.

CIMG0062 May 16 2018 can you spot the wire between the floorboards at SSUC

The loop wire went into a crack between two floorboards in the exposed areas of the sanctuary. Can you spot which crack the wire went in? (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Step 6:  Hooking the Loop Driver to the Sound System

After the wiring was done, the loop driver (amplifier) was hooked to the church’s sound system and calibrated to the IEC60118 standard for a compliant hearing loop.

CIMG0059 May 16 2018 Bill and Jack hook up the loop driver and calibrate

Bill Droogendyk (left) and Jack Sorensen (right) calibrate the loop driver after it’s been hooked up to the church’s sound system. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

After the technicians said everything worked, it was time for someone with hearing loss to give a verdict.  As no one had tested a pocket talker that had a telecoil built in it, that was chosen for a test of the hearing loop.  I tried it in various parts of the looped area and it worked perfectly.

CIMG0058 May 16 2018 Daria tests the hearing loop at SSUC

Thumbs up for a successful hearing loop installation at South Shore United Church. (Photo credit: Pieter Valkenburg)

CIMG0056 May 16 2018 Jack Pieter Bill at SSUC post installation

Smiles all around for a job well done! Left to right: Jack Sorensen, Pieter Valkenburg, Bill Droogendyk. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Step 7:  Post Signage

The last step in the installation was to post signs advising that the hearing loop was installed.  Stickers were placed on the pews in the looped area, and a notice with the universal logo indicating a telecoil was installed was given to the Church secretary for inclusion in the weekly bulletins.

Hearing Loop System Installed At

A brochure on the ways to access a hearing loop was printed, with publication costs for the brochures paid for by a grant from the PEI Seniors Secretariat.  (See The Let’s Loop PEI Project – How You Can Access An Area With A Hearing Loop for this same information.)

This was an amazing experience and everyone learned a lot about hearing loops.  Our thanks to the volunteers, CHHA Foundation, PEI Seniors Secretariat, and to Bill and Wilma Droogendyk of Better Hearing Solutions for making this installation possible.

Our Let’s Loop PEI story continues in the next blog posting.  You can email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on this blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI

Follow this link to our Upcoming Events page: Upcoming Events

Follow this link to places on PEI equipped with a hearing loop:  Places on PEI Equipped With A Hearing Loop

Like the work we do?  Consider a donation to help us do more.  100% of your donation stays on PEI to help Islanders.  We now have a page at the Canada Helps website: https://www.canadahelps.org/en/dn/34708

© Daria Valkenburg

Upcoming Fundraiser Ceilidh at Bonshaw Hall on May 27, 2018 at 2 pm

May 18, 2018.  As a small non-profit charitable organization, run on a volunteer basis, we are not swimming in money.  We receive grants for various projects, and the few non-projected related activities we can do are funded by donations.

We now have a page at the Canada Helps website.  If you are appreciative of the hard work we do to provide information and improve accessibility awareness for those with hearing loss, please consider making a donation.  Here is the link: https://www.canadahelps.org/en/dn/34708

We are also excited about an upcoming fundraising activity offered by Bonshaw Hall, which has monthly ceilidhs.  This month, the organizers are generously sharing their proceeds with us, to help in our non-project related activities. We hope you come out and enjoy the show, while helping us at the same time.  Below is the announcement from Bonshaw Hall:

The monthly Ceilidh Concert at Bonshaw Hall will be Sunday, ​May 27  from 2 – 4 pm. Performers include special musical guests  Island Girls (DonnaLee Perry​, Alice Gallant and Sadie Perry​) and singer/songwriter David MacKay.​ Also joining will be regulars Herb MacDonald, Andrea Corder, Phil Pineau and Tony the Troubador.  There will be a 50/50 draw, cookies & tea, and open stage time. Admission is by donation with proceeds going to the PEI ​Chapter of the Canadian ​​Hard of Hearing Association. ​All ages welcome; accessible for small wheelchairs. For more information phone 902-675-4093 or check their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/events/592420241122311/

You can email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on this blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI

Follow this link to our Upcoming Events page: Upcoming Events

Follow this link to places on PEI equipped with a hearing loop:  Places on PEI Equipped With A Hearing Loop

© Daria Valkenburg

We Try Out The Loop Access Devices

LoopPEI_logo-P2

May 15, 2018.  The Let’s Loop PEI project officially launched yesterday with the first day of an informational workshop, led by Bill Droogendyk of Better Hearing Solutions, on what a hearing loop actually is and how it works, followed by a site survey at South Shore United Church in Tryon.

CIMG0015 May 14 2018 Site survey SSUC

Pieter Valkenburg (left) and Jack Sorensen (right) loop wire between the pew rows during the site survey at South Shore United Church. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

A temporary loop was set up in the classroom where the workshops are being held, and I had a chance to try out the hearing loop receiver.  It didn’t work for me, so I was a bit disappointed. That’s when it was confirmed that I have no technological brain!  In order for the receiver to work, you have to first turn it on (duh!) and, second, the receiver has to be in an upright, not a horizontal position.  Once those two points were corrected, it was UNBELIEVABLE!  How do you describe a reaction that’s both astonishment and delight?  The clarity of sound was indescribable!

PLR-BP1-Williams-Sound-Loop-System-Body-Pack-Rece

PLR-BP1-Williams-Sound-Loop-System-Body-Pack-Rece

We were getting excited about the possibilities and eager to try out more of the ways to access a hearing loop.  Annie Lee MacDonald, who has an iPhone, had downloaded the app (see https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/loopbuds/id1111272148?mt=8).   Bill had brought along the special earbuds, OTOjOY, needed to access the hearing loop with the iPhone app.  The telecoil is in the earbuds.  Success!

Loop buds for iPhone (2)

Next, Brenda Porter, whose hearing aids have an activated T-coil switch, tried the hearing loop.  Another success!

We still have to try out the special pocket talker, something to look forward to in today’s workshop. Stay tuned!

Check our upcoming events page for information on a public information session coming up on Friday, May 18, 2018 at 7 pm at West River United Church in Cornwall, where you can experience the hearing loop, have any questions answered, and if needed, purchase a receiver, pocket talker, or the OTOjOY earbuds. You can email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on this blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI

Follow this link to our Upcoming Events page: Upcoming Events

© Daria Valkenburg

Everyone Is Looking For Solutions To Hearing Loss!

May 9, 2018.  Lately, it seems as though every day there is some bit of ‘information’ on how you can improve your hearing – preferably without a hearing aid, thank you – or new research to ‘cure’ or ‘reverse’ hearing loss.  In this blog posting, we’ll look at some of these initiatives, and you can decide for yourself if they have merit or are simply too good to possibly be true.

First, some new products, all of which have an app to be downloaded onto your smart phone:

  1. You know how you can go to a Dollar store and buy yourself a cheap pair of readers, which basically magnify what your eyes can see? They don’t replace prescription eyeglasses, but for those with mild vision loss, the readers can do the trick. You won’t be surprised to learn that there is a hearing loss version of readers, called ‘hearables’, which you can access via smart phone technology.  Not as inexpensive as readers, they are still less expensive than hearing aids, and the app gives you a mini hearing test which then allows the app to customize itself for your needs.  Interested?  Read this man’s story:  https://www.mnn.com/green-tech/gadgets-electronics/blogs/dont-call-iqbuds-boosts-hearing-aids-but-try-them.
  2. An Australian company offers a similar product, called ‘bluetooth buds’ that basically does the same thing as ‘hearables’, and they look the same. For that story, see this link: https://search.app.goo.gl/SB2QS.
  3. A third version of ‘hearables’ is called ‘Sonic Cloud’, which says it’s app can help you hear better when you use your smart phone to make a phone call, by allowing you to change the tone of a sound. Some of us hear lower tones better, others hear higher tones better, so it appears this app does more than amplify sound. See https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/12/soniccloud-raises-4m-to-bake-a-hearing-aid-into-phone-calls-through-an-app/ and https://www.soniccloud.com/.

Now, some new areas of research:

  1. An astonishing treatment by a team of researchers at the University of Southern California is proposing that hearing loss triggered by loud noises can be reversed by a salt and sugar solution. The premise? Fluid builds up in the inner ear a few hours after it’s been exposed to loud noise, and this fluid contains high concentrations of potassium. According to an article in Medical Xpress: “To reverse the effects of potassium and reduce the fluid buildup, salt- and sugar-based solutions were injected into the middle ear, just through the eardrum, three hours after noise exposure. The researchers found that treatment with these solutions prevented 45-64 percent of neuron loss, suggesting that the treatment may offer a way to preserve hearing function.” See https://search.app.goo.gl/Ft84o and http://neurosciencenews.com/noise-hearing-minimized-9002/.
  2. Researchers at the University of Southern California and Harvard University are working on medication, in the form of a liquid or gel, that attaches onto the inner ear to target damaged cells and encourage regeneration. Read more:

a)https://www.immortal.org/37171/researchers-may-have-new-treatment-for-hearing-loss/ and
b)https://news.usc.edu/140224/new-study-shows-hope-for-hearing-loss/ and c)http://www.techtimes.com/articles/224649/20180407/hope-for-hearing-researchers-working-on-novel-approach-to-treat-hearing-loss.htm

  1. 70% of patients who take a chemotherapy drug, cisplatin, experience irreversible hearing loss. Now, researchers at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have published a research article in the March 7, 2018 Journal of Experimental Medicine, outlining a preventative treatment they hope will prevent cisplatin- and noise-induced hearing loss in patients.  Read more: https://health.howstuffworks.com/medicine/medication/new-drugs-could-help-prevent-hearing-loss.htm and https://www.researchgate.net/blog/post/researchers-identify-drug-that-protects-mice-and-rats-against-hearing-loss.
  2. And finally, if you still didn’t have enough reasons to quit smoking, here’s another one. A Japanese study has found that smokers were 70% more likely to develop hearing loss than those who never smoked. Read more: https://www.sciencealert.com/smoking-causes-higher-risk-of-hearing-loss.

If you’ve tried any of these products or treatments please share your experience!  And if you’ve tried any other treatments or products, let us know. You can email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blog at https://theauralreport.wordpress.comYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI

Follow this link to our Upcoming Events page: Upcoming Events

© Daria Valkenburg

The Let’s Loop PEI Project – How You Can Access An Area With A Hearing Loop

April 27, 2018.  In two previous blog postings, an introduction to the Let’s Loop PEI project to encourage the installation of hearing loops was discussed.  We explained the concept of a hearing loop, and discussed some common questions regarding this technology.

As one of the objectives of the PEI Chapter of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association is to encourage hearing accessibility in public places, we are very grateful to the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association Foundation (CHHA Foundation) for providing a grant to begin this project on Prince Edward Island.

The subject of this posting is to answer the questions many of you have asked about accessing a looped area:

  • I have hearing loss, but don’t wear a hearing aid or have a cochlear implantCan I still access the hearing loop in a place it’s been installed?
  • I don’t know if my hearing aid or cochlear implant has a telecoil activated.
  • I have a cochlear implant or hearing aid without a telecoil.  How do I access the hearing loop in a place it’s been installed?

If you have a telecoil activated in your hearing aid or cochlear implant, you don’t need to do anything further, except to know how to turn it on!  Ask your audiologist for what you need to do. Otherwise, here are some options:

a) If you have a hearing aid that has a telecoil, but it isn’t activated, ask your audiologist for help. An instruction sheet for your audiologist is provided here. (See audiologists info on t-coil connectivity)

b) If you don’t have a telecoil, but you have an iPad or iPhone, you can download the software for free at: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/loopbuds/id1111272148?mt=8. Then you simply plug OTOjOY earbuds into your device and you will access the hearing loop. Unfortunately, at present, there is no software for Android devices.

Loop buds for iPhone (2)

c) If you have no telecoil nor an iPad or iPhone, you can purchase a small receiver to access the loop. Then, as with the iPad or iPhone, you plug earbuds or earphones into the receiver to access the hearing loop.

PLR-BP1-Williams-Sound-Loop-System-Body-Pack-Rece

PLR-BP1-Williams-Sound-Loop-System-Body-Pack-Rece

d) If you have no telecoil nor an iPad or iPhone, one type of pocket talker has hearing loop software built into it. If you are a user of a pocket talker, you may want to upgrade to this type of pocket talker as it does double duty.

Pocketalker PKT2B (PKTD2.0) from Williams Sound

Pocketalker PKT2B (PKTD2.0) from Williams Sound

Please remember -the hearing loop system is universal.  Whatever works here on PEI for you, will work anywhere in the world that a hearing loop is installed!

Have you been in a place with a hearing loop?  Please share your experience!  You can email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blog at https://theauralreport.wordpress.comYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI

Follow this link to our Upcoming Events page: Upcoming Events

© Daria Valkenburg

The Let’s Loop PEI Project – Some Questions and Answers We’ve Encountered

April 27, 2018.  In the previous blog posting (See … The Let’s Loop PEI Project), an introduction to the Let’s Loop PEI project to encourage the installation of hearing loops was discussed.  We explained the concept of a hearing loop, and provided a few links for further information. As one of the objectives of the PEI Chapter of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association is to encourage hearing accessibility in public places, we were grateful to the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association Foundation (CHHA Foundation) for providing a grant to get this project going on Prince Edward Island.

This posting discusses some of the questions we’ve encountered or had ourselves, and the answers to each question.  As this project unfolds, we will have more questions and in turn more answers!

#1.  The technology is old Our answer: Yes, and it’s still effective, relatively inexpensive, universal, and works anywhere in the world where a hearing loop is installed.  The physics of looping haven’t changed, only the hardware and methods of installation have changed.  The first plane flight was over 100 years ago.  We still fly on planes, but today’s planes look quite different from the days of the Wright brothers.

We all know how noisy airports are.  A hearing loop is available at the information kiosk at Schipol Airport in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. (Photo credits: Daria Valkenburg)

 #2. We already use BlueTooth, an FM System, Infrared, etc.  Our answer:  Blue Tooth is good technology for personal home and cellphone use, but has very limited use in the public square.

FM and Infrared hearing assistance systems are helpful technologies, but people are required to wear neck loops to access the system through their hearing aids, or have to remove their hearing aids and use a headset.  People with hearing loss already feel a stigma!  The irony is that hearing loss is a non-visible disability and most people like to keep it that way as they don’t want to be labelled as disabled.  Many people fear hearing loss will limit their career advancement, and the tendency is to try and hide it.

Hearing loss doesn’t only happen to adults.  Children can also have hearing loss.  Like adults, they don’t want to be labelled either by having to wear neck loops in situations where a discreet setting on a telecoil in a hearing loop or cochlear implant can work. In the ‘Spotlight on Invisible Disabilities Community Consultations on Federal Accessibility Legislation – Year 2 Report’, Appendix 4: May 25, 2017: Youth and Technology Recommendations from the Young Adult Network of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association, “the panelists spoke to the stigma they experienced, particularly in primary and secondary education, around technology in the classroom, as well as the need for increased awareness in the workplace.

See the ALSComparisonChart  for a comparison of Hearing Loops, FM System, Infrared.

#3.  How many people are going to use it?  We don’t want to be the only ones taking a risk.  Our answer:  How many people use a wheelchair ramp?  We wouldn’t consider not having one! And if no one wants to be first, where do you start?  40% of our Canadian population has some degree of hearing loss, and it isn’t decreasing.

Here is a link to a video illustrating how a Hearing Loop helps users with hearing loops on public transport at Sheffield Railway Station in England. Enjoy!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DBL2gDlrEo

In the next blog entry, we will discuss the various ways that you can access the loop in a looped area if you have hearing loss.

Have you been in a place with a hearing loop?  Please share your experience!  You can email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blog at https://theauralreport.wordpress.comYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI

Follow this link to our Upcoming Events page: Upcoming Events

© Daria Valkenburg