Accessible Hotel Rooms For Those With Hearing Loss

January 10, 2019.  When you travel and you have hearing loss, you need to have a lot of patience and a good sense of humour, as all kinds of adventures await you.  Staying in a hotel has its own challenges.  Will you hear someone knocking on the door?  What happens if you want a wake-up call so you can catch an early flight?  What if there is a fire and you don’t hear the alarm?

Everyone with hearing loss has a story to tell! One time, at an airport hotel in Winnipeg, I requested a wake-up call so I could catch an early morning flight.  Unfortunately I slept in and didn’t hear the phone ringing.  When I didn’t answer after several tries, the hotel staff came banging on the door.  I didn’t hear that either.  Finally, they opened the door with a master key and that finally woke me up.  If I hadn’t let them know the evening before that I was hard of hearing when I checked in, I don’t know what they would have done!  Luckily, I made my plane connection on time!

Recently I’ve been travelling in the USA and noticed that each hotel I stayed at had hearing accessibility rooms.  Sometimes there were just a few rooms, and these tended to also be the rooms with handicapped access for those with physical disabilities.   So I was surprised to see a large number of rooms only for hearing accessibility in a recently renovated Fairfield Inn in Christiansburg, Virginia.

intl sign explanation hoh

The international sign of a broken ear is on the door of the accessible rooms, with a button to push instead of knocking.  This sets off flashing lights in the room.  When I went down to the front desk to commend the staff, the hotel desk proudly told me that “We also keep a list at the hotel desk, in case of an emergency.

img_20181229_172918284-1 dec 29 2018 sign on hoh accessible room at fairfield inn christiansburg

Sign on hotel room door in Christiansburg, Virginia, indicating the room is accessible for those with hearing loss. (Photo credit: Pieter Valkenburg)

In West Knoxville, Tennessee, at another Fairfield Inn, we noticed several hearing accessible rooms here too, and when I went to the front desk to commend them on having these rooms available, the hotel’s General Manager, Trent Walker, came out to speak with me.

cimg2889 dec 31 2018 trent walker mgr of fairfield inn west knoxville

Trent Walker, General Manager of the Fairfield Inn in West Knoxville, Tennessee. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Mr. Walker explained that alterations to the Americans With Disability Act meant that 10% of the ‘inventory’ (ie rooms) of a new hotel or a renovated hotel had to be accessible for those with disabilities. In accordance with these regulations, most hotels now have each hotel room identified in Braille for those with vision loss. There are rooms accessible for those with physical disabilities, identified with a wheelchair sign on the door.  And there are now rooms with accessibility for those with hearing loss, identified by the international broken ear sign.  Some rooms do double duty as being accessible for those with physical limitations, as well as with hearing loss.  As with the hotel in Christiansburg, there is a button on the door, which sets off flashing lights in the room to alert the person that someone is at the door.

img_20181231_093541246 dec 30 2018 hearing accessible door sign in fairfield inn west knoxville

A room that is accessible both to those with physical disabilities and those with hearing loss. (Photo credit: Pieter Valkenburg)

As well, he explained that the hotel has two kits available to those with hearing loss.  Each kit has a bed shaker alarm, a visual smoke alarm, and a phone that connects to the regular room phone and allows you to receive messages by text.  “Did I want to see a kit?”  I was asked.  Of course I did!

cimg2888 dec 31 2018 kit for hoh at fairfield inn west knoxville

Accessibility kit for those with hearing loss, available to guests at Fairfield Inn in West Knoxville, Tennessee. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Mr. Walker explained each item in the kit and invited me to ask for one next time I’m in the hotel.  Now that I know about it, you can bet that I will.

And finally, we noticed hearing accessible rooms at a Residence Inn in Miramar Beach, Florida.  Each room in the hotel also has the number listed in Braille.  Note the button for the audiovisual door alert to trigger flashing lights in the room to let the occupant know someone is at the door.

A hearing accessible room at a Residence Inn in Miramar Beach, Florida. (Photo credit: Pieter Valkenburg)

Kudos to these hotels for making accessibility easier for people with hearing loss.  If you travel and are in a hotel with this accommodation, please make sure you let the hotel staff know how much it is appreciated …. even if you don’t stay in one of these rooms yourself.

This experience has made me wonder if any hotels on Prince Edward Island have made accommodation for those with hearing loss! Does anyone know? If you’ve tried out one of the kits on your travels, please share your experience. Email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI.

© Daria Valkenburg

 

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Hearing Accessibility Tool Now Available At Victim Services Offices in Charlottetown and Summerside

December 5, 2018.  If you’ve ever been the victim of a crime, then you know how stressful it can be to deal with all that follows….. police, maybe a court appearance, lawyers.  If you have hearing loss as well, your stress load can double or triple, depending on what happened.

We need all our faculties just to hear on a daily basis, and anything that can upset us or cause anxiety makes it very difficult to have the concentration needed to focus on hearing.

Over the past two years, a program to improve communication between the legal community and those with hearing loss was made possible by a grant from the Law Foundation of PEI.  As more and more members of the legal community learned about the program they not only willingly participated, but encouraged others to participate as well.  One of the first comments we received came from the Honourable David Jenkins, Chief Justice of PEI, who noted, “Effective sharing of legal information and opportunity for participation in legal proceedings are integral components to access to justice. This initiative to facilitate a better understanding of the law and improved communication for people who are hard of hearing is to be commended.

Navigating a world in which you have been a victim is traumatic, so we were very pleased when Victim Services heard about the program from Kelly Robinson of CLIA PEI and wanted to participate.  To help in our mutual goal of access to justice for all, we provided a few tips on better communication with those with hearing loss and introduced staff at the Charlottetown office to a portable hearing accessibility tool to amplify sound – a pocket talker.

Susan Maynard, Provincial Manager, Victim Services, explained that “Victim Services is a program of the Department of Justice and Public Safety which assists victims in the aftermath of a crime and throughout their involvement in the criminal justice system.

CIMG2838 Nov 26 2018 Victim Services bought 2 pocket talkers

Seated, left to right: Annie Lee MacDonald; Susan Maynard, Provincial Manager, Victim Services; Darrell Gallant, Alternative Dispute Resolution; Georgina Bowness, Victim Services Worker. Standing, left to right: Daria Valkenburg; Catherine Chaisson, Office of the Childrens’ Lawyer. (Photo taken by Carolyn Peters, Victim Services Worker)

We asked what kind of assistance Victim Services provides, and Susan gave us a summary of the varied and important work done by this office. “Services include:

information about the status of your case and the criminal justice system

– short term counselling and emotional support

– referrals

court preparation

– help in preparing a victim impact statement

– assistance under the ‘Victims of Family Violence’ Act

risk assessment and safety planning

– help to recover financial losses

-coordination of services”

So, if you’re the victim of a crime on PEI and have hearing loss, you’ll be happy to know that Victim Services of the PEI Department of Justice & Public Safety has a pocket talker at the offices in Charlottetown & Summerside. All you have to do is speak up and ask to use one.  Kudos for increasing hearing accessibility!

Contact information for Victim Services: 

  • Queens and Kings Counties: 1 Harbourside Access Rd., Charlottetown, PE. Phone: 902-368-4582.
  • Prince County: Suite 19, 2nd Floor, 263 Harbour Drive, Summerside, PE. Phone: 902-888-8218.

For a list of lawyers on PEI and other members of the law community who have a pocket talker in their office, and who have agreed to have their information posted on the blog, see: https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/pei-lawyers-with-pocket-talkers/

If you would like to participate in this program for improving hearing accessibility, let us know.  Email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI.

Don’t miss our upcoming events:

  • Event in Venue Equipped With A Hearing Loop:  UPCOMING CONCERT: Sorensen Christmas Concert at South Shore United Church in Tryon, 7:30 pm on Friday, December 7, 2018.  “The Shepherds Were the First to Hear”, held in the sanctuary. Lunch and a time for Christmas socializing will follow the concert. Admission is a freewill offering which will be donated to the Church Building Fund. This venue is equipped with a hearing loop for the benefit of those with hearing lossIf you have never heard the clarity of sound through a hearing loop, this is an opportunity to try it out.
  • Event in Venue with Real Time Captioning and a temporary hearing loop: The PEI Human Rights Commission & Town of Stratford are hosting Human Rights Day 2018 at Stratford Town Hall, Monday, December 10, 2018, from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm. This year’s event is to celebrate 70 years since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and to introduce the new vertical $10 bill featuring Viola Desmond of Nova Scotia.  This event will have real time captioning available for the benefit of those with hearing loss, as well as a temporary hearing loop so you can experience the clarity of sound.  We will be there to answer any questions as well.

Check out our Upcoming Events page for more events.  (See https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/upcoming-events/)

© Daria Valkenburg

 

The Sound Through A Hearing Loop

November 8, 2018.  Quite often, we’re asked what the difference is in what someone hears within a hearing loop and outside of a hearing loop.  We’ve sent links that others have shared with us, and encouraged people to visit venues on the island that have a hearing loop installed.  During a sound and equipment check for a presentation last week at South Shore United Church in Tryon, Jack Sorensen of the church made a recording for us.  He recorded the presenter, Pieter Valkenburg, as heard through a microphone by the front pew of the church, and as heard through the hearing loop.

Jane Scott and Don Gribble were kind enough to transfer the audio files to a website, which allowed us to provide the links you see below. Can you hear the difference in sound quality?

looped vs non looped

What was recorded through the microphone by the front pew of the church: 

https://soundcloud.com/user-82887253/zoom0013pieternonloopedmp3?utm_source=soundcloud&utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=email

What was recorded through the hearing loop:

https://soundcloud.com/user-82887253/zoom0012pieterloopedmp3?utm_source=soundcloud&utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=email

Several blog postings have been written on hearing loops and there is a site page on this blog for places on the island where a hearing loop has been installed (See https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/places-on-pei-equipped-with-a-hearing-loop/).

While we are at the beginning of looping projects on the island, other places have been very creative in making sure accessibility for those with hearing loss is a priority.  Previous postings have mentioned a number of places around the world.  This time, here is a link to a story about shoppers in one store in Maryland who can choose the ‘hearing loop lane’ when it’s time to pay!  See http://www.baltimoresun.com/bs-bz-wegmans-hearing-loops-20160116-story.html

Thank you to Jack, Jane, and Don for their help with the sound files.  Do you have a hearing loss issue you’d like to share?  Email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI.

Don’t miss our upcoming events:   

November Chapter meeting:  Tuesday, November 27, 2018 at 9:30 am at North Tryon Presbyterian Church. Guest speaker will be Jessyca Bedard, Clinical Support & Business Development Manager for Oticon Medical Canada, who will talk about BAHAs (Bone Anchored Hearing Aids).  The presentation will be followed by our Annual General Meeting.

Presentation:  Annie Lee MacDonald and Daria Valkenburg have been invited to talk about the pocket talker project with the Law Foundation of PEI and PEI lawyers at the upcoming meeting of the PEI Seniors Secretariat on November 30, 2018.

Check out our Upcoming Events page for even more events.  (See https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/upcoming-events/)

 

© Daria Valkenburg

Let’s Loop PEI – Clarity Of Sound Is Available Through A Hearing Loop

LoopPEI_logo-P2

October 24, 2018.  Have you tried out a hearing loop?  This spring two churches and the City of Charlottetown’s town hall all installed hearing loops, an excellent accessibility tool for those who have hearing loss.  If you haven’t yet taken advantage of the opportunity to hear the clarity of sound received through a hearing loop, you should.  You’ll be wondering why hearing loops aren’t available in every public venue.

Hearing loops are widely available in Europe and Australia, and a wave of hearing loop installations have occurred in the last few years in the USA and western Canada.  Every day you can read about venues in North America that have been looped.

In previous postings, you’ve had a chance to read about some of the looped areas.  Here are two more:  the Eiffel Tower in Paris (See https://www.ampetronic.co/Entertainment/eiffel-tower-ampetronic-hearing-loop-technology/24275) and Buckingham Palace. (See https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/visit/the-royal-mews-buckingham-palace/ddeaf-or-hard-of-hearing#/)

Recently I read that the first hearing aid with a telecoil was made in 1936, to make it easier to hear on the telephone!  While the physics involved hasn’t changed, technology has improved.  In a recent article on hearing loops, a good explanation was given on why it’s so popular with those who have experienced it:  “Hearing loop systems take sound straight from the source and deliver it right into the listener’s hearing aid without extraneous noise or blurring. To them, it sounds like the speaker is right in their head. It turns their hearing aids into wireless earphones that broadcast sound customized for their hearing loss.” (See http://otojoy.com/loopsandiego.org/faq.html)

If you don’t have a hearing aid or cochlear implant, you can still access a hearing loop through a receiver.  (See The Let’s Loop PEI Project – How You Can Access An Area With A Hearing Loop for more information.)

Events in Venue Equipped With A Hearing Loop

Two upcoming events at looped churches give you a chance to experience a hearing loop.

CONCERT:  Men of the Harvest’ Concert at West River United Church in Cornwall, Sunday, October 28, 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm (Doors open at 2:30 pm).  Admission: $10 at the door. ‘Men of The Harvest’ is a multi-denominational men’s choir formed in the fall of 2013, under the direction of Bonnie LaFrance. Since that time, ‘Men of The Harvest’ has shared the unique strength and power of the male voice with audiences throughout PEI. Old favourites and contemporary pieces laden with harmony have warmed the hearts of the appreciative audiences.

PRESENTATION: Senate of Canada 150 Medal recipient Pieter Valkenburg will speak about the Borden-Carleton Cenotaph Research Project at South Shore United Church in Tryon, 7 pm on Friday, November 2, 2018 This event is co-hosted by South Shore United Church and Tryon & Area Historical Society.

To learn more about hearing loops, see previous blog postings: The Let’s Loop PEI Project and The Let’s Loop PEI Project – Some Questions and Answers We’ve Encountered. Other blog postings have documented the steps that were involved in ensuring that their hearing loop was installed according to IEC60118 international installation standards.

We’d like to hear from you if you’ve tried a hearing loop.  And we’d like to know what places on PEI you’d like to see looped.  Email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI.

Don’t miss our upcoming events:   

October Chapter meeting:  Tuesday, October 30, 2018 at 9:30 am at North Tryon Presbyterian Church.  Guest speaker will be audiologist Peter Benstead of PEI Audiology, to let us know about the firm’s public information campaign for hearing health.  With hearing loops now being available at venues on PEI, Peter will also let you know how you can have a telecoil activated to your hearing aid.

We will be in Montague on October 27, 2018!  We will have a table at the 7th Annual Learning and Caring for Ourselves Conference, an event hosted by the Seniors Secretariat of PEI on Saturday, October 27, 9 am-3 pm at Montague Regional High School.  See https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/event/learning-and-caring-ourselves-conference-0 for more information on this event.

Check out our Upcoming Events page for even more events.  (See https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/upcoming-events/)

© Daria Valkenburg

Would You Wear Glasses?

October 18, 2018.  Glasses have been in the news lately.  Do you wear glasses?  I do, and since I love to see where I’m going, I wouldn’t be without them.  So what’s new with glasses?

If you enjoy going to the movies, then you may have noticed that on PEI they have a closed captioning system you can ask for when you buy your ticket.  This little device sits in the cup holder and you can then swivel your head back and forth between what’s on the big screen and then down to the cup holder to see what is being said.  It works.

In many other places, there are closed captioning screens on either side of the big screen.  If you go to an opera, then you know what I’m talking about.  The opera is sung in one language, with surtitles displayed in the language of the audience (ie English) so you know what the singers are saying.

Now you can borrow Smart Caption Glasses that operate like 3-D.  You look at the big screen at the movies, and the closed captioning is displayed right in front of your very eyes.  No need to swivel your head, as the captions are right in your line of vision!  See https://hackaday.com/2018/10/14/glasses-for-the-hearing-impaired/ for more information and watch a short video (which has closed captioning).  Absolutely fascinating!

That’s the future, and it’s an exciting one that makes the world become more inclusive.  However, there is a long way to go, as I found out in an article I recently read in The Economist.  In parts of Asia, there are many people who earn their living not by receiving a wage, but by doing piecework.  One example used is that of people working in a garment factory who are paid by each piece successfully completed.  My maternal grandmother worked in a garment factory, so the article caught my attention.

Here’s what the gist of the article was about…..Older adults, whose vision is no longer as good as it once was, are not able to be as productive because they can’t see well.  The solution? Give them a pair of glasses.  For those who accepted the glasses, productivity increased by 39%.  A no-brainer, you’d think, right?  If being able to see increases your earnings, wouldn’t you want a pair of glasses?

The problem?  Many people don’t want to wear glasses!  They think it makes them look ‘ugly’! Some countries have regulatory hurdles, where glasses can only be provided by licenced practitioners. No going to the local pharmacy or dollar store for a pair of ‘readers’.  Read the article for yourself at https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/2018/08/02/wear-glasses-earn-more.

The Economist article made me think of how many of us avoid dealing with hearing loss.  We pretend we can hear fine, we avoid going out as often, and we can find it difficult to adjust to the fact that hearing aids and other assistive listening devices are now part of our lives.  With all the new tools and research coming out, we should be embracing how lucky we are to be living at a time when so many people are trying to help and find solutions!

Do you have a hearing loss story to share?  Email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI.

Don’t miss our upcoming events: 

October Chapter meeting:  Tuesday, October 30, 2018 at 9:30 am at North Tryon Presbyterian Church.  Guest speaker will be audiologist Peter Benstead of PEI Audiology, to let us know about the firm’s public information campaign for hearing health.  With hearing loops now being available at venues on PEI, Peter will also let you know how you can have a telecoil activated to your hearing aid.

We will be in Montague on October 27, 2018!  We will have a table at the 7th Annual Learning and Caring for Ourselves Conference, an event hosted by the Seniors Secretariat of PEI on Saturday, October 27th, 9am-3pm at Montague Regional High School.  See https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/event/learning-and-caring-ourselves-conference-0 for more information on this event.

Upcoming Event in a Looped Venue: Senate of Canada 150 Medal recipient Pieter Valkenburg will speak about the Borden-Carleton Cenotaph Research Project at South Shore United Church in Tryon, 7 pm on Friday, November 2, 2018.  This event is co-hosted by South Shore United Church and Tryon & Area Historical Society.  Note: this venue is equipped with a hearing loop for the benefit of those with hearing loss.  If you haven’t experienced the clarity of sound that you hear through a hearing loop, this is your opportunity.  Email dariadv@yahoo.ca for more info.

Event in Venue Equipped With A Hearing Loop:  UPCOMING PRESENTATION: Sorensen Christmas Concert at South Shore United Church in Tryon, 7:30 pm on Friday, December 7, 2018.  Freewill offering, beneficiary will be South Shore United Church. This venue is equipped with a hearing loop for the benefit of those with hearing loss. If you have never heard the clarity of sound through a hearing loop, this is an opportunity to try it out.

© Daria Valkenburg

Sometimes Technology Advances Are Great

August 29, 2018.  I’m not a big fan of much technological advances as usually it means life becomes more complicated or something that used to be simple to use becomes harder.  One example is a telephone.  At one time, a telephone was just that – a phone.  It didn’t have any bells or whistles, and was simple to use.  I must admit that I don’t miss the childhood days of rotary dialling, however.

Then they invented cordless phones.  At one time, the phone was in a fixed location, attached to a jack in the wall.  If you wanted to move it around, you needed a long extension wire to move it from a location far away from the jack.  I remember we had one long wire so we could have a phone outdoors on the patio. Cordless phones removed that headache as you could pick up the receiver and take it anywhere you wanted.  However, if you had hearing loss, the sound quality was not great.

Between cordless phones and cell phones, I grew to intensely dislike talking on the phone.  So, when our cordless phones finally gave up the ghost I rejoiced.  Yeah, no more phones.  We had one old phone with a very good quality speaker and I figured that’s all we needed.  After all, we don’t use a phone very much.

My husband, aka Tech Support in our household, had other ideas.  He bought new portable, inexpensive phones.  Of course, I griped for quite a while about the waste of money and pointed out it was useless to me.  He ignored me and proceeded to set up the phones.

Which ringtone can you hear best?” was his first question.  There were 10 choices and there was one I could hear from anywhere in the house, to my surprise.

After setting up the phones he then called me from his cell phone and asked me to test if I could hear him.  I could, loud and clear, another surprise.  And it wasn’t at the highest volume!

The phone was even easy to use, a third surprise.

But the biggest surprise came when he showed me the box.  These inexpensive phones were telecoil compatible!  Telecoils have moved into the mainstream!

cimg2535.jpg

Inexpensive cordless phones, bought at any office supply store, have a telecoil. Look on the bottom right hand corner of the box for the telecoil sign. (Photo credit: Pieter Valkenburg)

CIMG2540

Brief explanation from the user guide.

I love our new phones now, even the ringtone! At the same time as we got our new phones, I read about a new type of headphone that adjusts the sound according to your hearing ability.  Yes, a headphone that gives a mini hearing test, then automatically adjusts itself so that your experience is enhanced.  (See https://www.wired.com/review/review-even-h3-wireless-headphones/)

The third piece of technology I’ve read about is for people with iPhones and hearing aids.  There is now an app which turns an iPhone into a directional microphone to help the user hear sounds around the user via the phone, sending sound directly into the user’s hearing aid.  (See https://beebom.com/apple-airpods-hearing-aids-ios-12/)

I give the new cordless phones a thumbs up.  If anyone has tried the new headphone or iPhone app, let us know!  Email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

sympathy-word-cliparts-140837-2009840

 

Sad News:  Our condolences to Annie Wood on the recent death of her husband. For more information, see http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/obituaries/allister-sherman-wood-7223/

 © Daria Valkenburg

Hearing Accessibility Tool Now Available At CLIA PEI

July 26, 2018.  After CBC PEI ran an article and interview about the project to help improve communication between those with hearing loss and the legal community (See CBC PEI Helps To Get The Word Out On ‘How A Project To Improve Legal Communication Is Helping Islanders To Hear Better’), we were contacted by CLIA PEI, the Community Legal Information Association in PEI.  This is a non-profit charitable organization that provides information, referrals, and support on legal issues.

Access to justice is important and the staff members at CLIA are dedicated to offering help – at no cost – in navigating the many questions people may have concerning legal issues.  Some examples include answering basic legal questions, or what to do about a particular legal problem.  They have kits available for a modest price for uncontested divorces, or for powers of attorney.  And if you do need to speak with a lawyer, they have a lawyer referral service that gives you a chance to speak with a lawyer for up to 45 minutes for a small fee (currently $25 plus tax).

So we were delighted that CLIA PEI wanted to participate in the project.  To help in our mutual goal of access to justice for all, we provided a few tips on better communication with those with hearing loss and lent them a hearing accessibility tool – a pocket talker.

IMG_2652 Eliza MacLauchlan and Emma Chilton Photo by Ellen Mullally

Eliza MacLauchlan, left, and Emma Chilton, right, use the pocket talker to look over materials left for improving communications with those with hearing loss. (Photo credit: Ellen Mullally)

We look forward to hearing feedback from the range of clients CLIA PEI helps!  If you have legal questions and don’t know who to ask, contact them.  And don’t forget to ask to use the pocket talker if you need a bit of help to hear better, but don’t have a hearing aid or cochlear implant.

CIMG1195 Jul 24 2018 CLIA with pocket talker

Left to right: CLIA Executive Director Ellen Mullally, Daria Valkenburg, CLIA Program Coordinator Kelly Robinson, CLIA Public Legal Education and Information Officer Eliza MacLauchlan. Eliza has the pocket talker, and Kelly our ‘Pardon Me What Did You Say?’ booklet. Notice the wealth of legal information available behind us? (Photo credit: Pieter Valkenburg)

For more information on the program with the legal community, which is funded by a grant from the Law Foundation of PEI, see Improving Communication Between the Legal Community and Those With Hearing Loss.

For a list of lawyers on PEI with a pocket talker in their office, and who have agreed to have their information posted on the blog, see: PEI Lawyers With Pocket Talkers.

Contact information for CLIA PEI:  Community Legal Information Association of PEI, Phone: 902-892-0853 or 1-800-240-9798 (toll-free in the Atlantic provinces).  Website:  www.cliapei.ca. Address: 111-40 Enman Crescent, Charlottetown, PE C1E 1E6. Email: clia@cliapei.ca.

If you are a lawyer who would like to participate, let us know.  If you have hearing loss and don’t have a hearing aid, and your lawyer is not part of this project, ask him or her to consider participation. If you have used a pocket talker at either CLIA or a law office, let us know! Email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blogYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI.

© Daria Valkenburg

Billing Counter at City of Charlottetown City Hall is Looped!

LoopPEI_logo-P2

July 25, 2018.  Yesterday another step forward for accessibility for those with hearing loss was made.  The City of Charlottetown has been active in ensuring hearing accessibility at City Hall.  The reception area and council chambers have had a hearing loop installed (See Charlottetown City Hall is Looped). With the help of our PEI based Let’s Loop PEI technicians, the city has now also looped the billing counter in their accounts receivable area on the main floor.

CIMG1191 Jul 24 2018 Ctown city hall Phil Daria Tom

With Phil Pater, left, and Tom Barnes, right, outside City of Charlottetown’s City Hall. (Photo credit: Brett MacFadyen)

The installation happened early in the morning, just as City Hall opened.  Phil Pater and Tom Barnes, two well known sound technicians on the island, are certified to install hearing loops according to IEC60118 international installation standards.  We’re delighted that these professionals are willing to add hearing loop installations to the list of services they offer.

CIMG1183 Jul 24 2018 Ctown city hall Tom & Phil installing loop at billing counter

Tom Barnes (by counter) and Phil Pater (behind counter) ensure the counter loop is installed properly. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Once the hearing loop was installed it was time to test it.  Can you see the delight on Phil’s face when he realizes the counter loop is ‘activated’?

CIMG1185 Jul 24 2018 Ctown city hall Phil has aha moment when trying out the loop

Phil Pater checks out the hearing loop while Tom Barnes speaks to him from behind the counter. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

My turn was next, and Phil was quick to catch my ‘aha’ moment, when I could hear Tom, who sat behind the counter.

CIMG1186 Jul 24 2018 Ctown city hall Daria has an aha moment

Wow! What clarity of sound! (Photo credit: Phil Pater)

Once we knew the hearing loop worked, the staff members behind the accounts receivable department counter were invited to test it out.  Summer student Brett MacFadyen had his own ‘aha’ moment.

CIMG1188 Jul 24 2018 Ctown city hall summer student Brett MacFadyen has an aha moment

Summer student Brett MacFadyen, who works at the billing counter, tries out the hearing loop. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

We applaud the City of Charlottetown for their initiative in bringing accessibility for those with hearing loss to City Hall.  We encourage more places to join them. Counter loops are affordable and easily installed. If you have a venue that uses a counter or booth with a glass barrier, please consider the benefits of making your venue more accessible!

Have you tried out one of the loops installed at City Hall?  Email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blog at https://theauralreport.wordpress.comYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI.

List of places on PEI with a hearing loop: https://theauralreport.wordpress.com/places-on-pei-equipped-with-a-hearing-loop/

© Daria Valkenburg

 

CBC PEI Helps To Get The Word Out On ‘How A Project To Improve Legal Communication Is Helping Islanders To Hear Better’

July 13, 2018.  We are very lucky here on Prince Edward Island to have the support of media that help us keep the public informed on activities related to those with hearing loss.  As a volunteer non-profit organization we may not have a lot of resources, but we certainly have a lot of champions!  The ‘County Line Courier’ and ‘Summerside Citizen’ newspapers feature our articles, and CBC PEI helps us reach Islanders far and wide.

Earlier this week I was in the CBC Mainstreet studio to support my husband, in an interview he had with Angela Walker for a Cenotaph Research Project.  While there, I was invited to talk about one of our current projects, helping to improve communications between Island lawyers and those with hearing loss.

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At the CBC Mainstreet studio. (Photo credit: Angela Walker)

Here is the link to that interview:  http://www.cbc.ca/listen/shows/mainstreet-pei/segment/15556801 and the description from the CBC website:  The PEI Chapter of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association and the Law Foundation of PEI have expanded on a project to ensure lawyers and their clients with hearing difficulties are able to effectively communicate.

CBC PEI went a step further with a web article about the project as well.  Here is the link to the CBC PEI article by Kevin Yarr: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-pocketalker-lawyers-hearing-impaired-1.4744340, with a transcription of the article below.

How a project to improve legal communication is helping Islanders hear better

‘They did a big public service’

Kevin Yarr · CBC News · Posted: Jul 12, 2018 8:00 PM AT | Last Updated: July 12

annie-lee-macdonald-with-pocketalker sarah macmillan cbc

Islanders who are hard of hearing are discovering how useful these Pockettalkers can be, thanks to a pilot project with P.E.I. lawyers. (Sarah MacMillan/CBC)

A project to help clients understand lawyers’ legal advice is bringing some unexpected benefits, says the P.E.I. chapter of the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association.

The pilot project, launched last year, distributed 10 assistive listening devices called Pocketalkers to interested lawyers. The handheld device, which includes headphones, amplifies sounds nearby and helps users filter out background noise so they can focus on what is being said.

Association spokeswoman Daria Valkenburg said lawyers using the device have helped Islanders discover how useful they can be.

“We always knew when a lawyer was in a seniors’ home, if they had gone to visit anybody, because we’d immediately get an email or a phone call saying I want one of those Pocketalkers,” said Valkenburg.

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P.E.I.’s Hard of Hearing Association has developed a brochure for the reception areas of lawyers’ offices that will encourage people with hearing loss to ask for help. (Angela Walker/CBC)

“They did a big public service. We were getting stories from people saying, ‘I can now play cards, ‘I can now go to talk to my kids.’ I think that’s really important. It helped with different types of social isolation.”

The project received funding and support from the Law Foundation of P.E.I.

The project is continuing this year with a new feature — the association has developed a brochure for the reception areas of lawyers’ offices that will encourage people with hearing loss to ask for help.

For a list of lawyers on PEI with a pocket talker in their office, and who have agreed to have their information posted on the blog, please see here: PEI Lawyers With Pocket Talkers

If you are a lawyer who would like to participate, let us know.  If you have hearing loss and don’t have a hearing aid, and your lawyer is not part of this project, ask him or her to consider participation.  You can email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blog at https://theauralreport.wordpress.comYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI.

And if you’re curious about the Cenotaph Research Project interview, you can listen to it here:  https://www.cbc.ca/listen/shows/mainstreet-pei/segment/15556040. CBC summary:  Finding the heroic stories behind the names on a local cenotaph. Pieter Valkenburg is a Dutch Canadian who wanted to learn more about the names on the Borden-Carleton Cenotaph. So he started a research project to find the stories behind these fallen soldiers.

Like the work we do?  Consider a donation to help fund activities not covered by a grant.  100% of your donation stays on PEI to help Islanders. See our page at the Canada Helps website:  https://www.canadahelps.org/en/dn/34708

© Daria Valkenburg

Improving Communication Between the Legal Community and Those With Hearing Loss

July 13, 2018.  A 2017 posting featured a project funded by the Law Foundation of PEI, which allowed us to work with PEI lawyers to help improve communications between lawyers and those with hearing loss.  (See Pocket Talker Pilot Project With PEI’s Legal Community).  The project, “Understanding the Law: Improving Communication for the Hard of Hearing in Our Legal Spaces”, was very successful and renewed for this year.  (See A Pocket Talker Can Open Up Your World)

As Law Foundation of PEI Chair Gary Scales explained in an interview, “This project promotes ways to improve communications with clients requiring legal services who have hearing difficulty.”

On June 23 we were invited to give an overview of the project at the Annual Law Society of PEI meeting.  We met many of the lawyers who participated last year and invited more lawyers to participate this year.

CIMG0886 Jun 23 2018 Annie Lee & Daria by booth at Crowbush Annual Law Society meeting

Annie Lee MacDonald and Daria Valkenburg at the Annual Law Society of PEI Annual General Meeting at Crowbush.

We were able to publicly thank the Law Foundation of PEI and the Law Society of PEI for supporting this project and explained how we were part of an active group that encourages hearing accessibility in public spaces, provides information on hearing related topics, and tries to build awareness.

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Susan Robinson, Q.C., Secretary-Treasurer and Executive Director of the Law Society of PEI, with Annie Lee MacDonald at Crowbush. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

An overview of the project’s objective to improve communication between the legal community and its clients with hearing loss was given, why it was important, and how lawyers could participate.

In the presentation given by Daria Valkenburg, she noted Last year, all of the lawyers in active practice ended up buying their pocket talker as they found it so useful. So what did we learn after a year?  The project exceeded our expectations, and was a win-win for both lawyers and for those with hearing loss.  Participating lawyers were very receptive and gave us some good tips as well, which were incorporated into a brochure for clients with hearing loss.  Every lawyer who participates in the project gets a number of brochures to have in the office. This was an excellent suggestion made by one of the participants.

One of the challenges identified is hard of hearing clients who do not self-identify. Since a reluctance to self-identify is an ongoing issue with many people with hearing loss, the tip sheets and discussions help you, as lawyers, to identify some of the ways to detect hearing loss informally.

One of the unexpected benefits of this project was that lawyers began informing seniors’ homes and seniors about the pocket talker.  This community service has had a ripple effect as once a lawyer was in the facility, we got contacted so that the seniors homes and seniors could purchase their own pocket talkers.  This helps improve their quality of life and reduces social isolation by being better able to communicate.

This year, lawyers who purchased a pocket talker for their office were invited to have their information posted on our blog as a public service to those with hearing loss, and most said yes.

The project was expanded with a brochure placed in the offices of lawyers with pocket talkers, in the hope that it will encourage people with hearing loss to self-identify in order to provide the best legal experience possible. Removing the stigma that many feel is a challenge hopefully will be more easily met now that there are legal firms who have participated in the project and begun to build awareness within their own client base.

Lawyer Daniel Tweel of Charlottetown represented last year’s participants, and explained that participation in the project was both useful and practical.

CIMG0895 Jun 23 2018 Danny Tweel & Daria at Law Society of PEI meeting Crowbush

Charlottetown lawyer Daniel Tweel with Daria Valkenburg at Crowbush. (Photo credit: Annie Lee MacDonald)

For a list of lawyers on PEI with a pocket talker in their office, and who have agreed to have their information posted on the blog, please see here:  PEI Lawyers With Pocket Talkers

If you are a lawyer who would like to participate, let us know.  If you have hearing loss and don’t have a hearing aid, and your lawyer is not part of this project, ask him or her to consider participation.  You can email us at hearpei@gmail.com or comment on our blog at https://theauralreport.wordpress.comYou can also follow us on Twitter: @HearPEI.

Like the work we do?  Consider a donation to help fund activities not covered by a grant.  100% of your donation stays on PEI to help Islanders. See our page at the Canada Helps website:  https://www.canadahelps.org/en/dn/34708

© Daria Valkenburg