Exploring The Option of Renting Your Hearing Aids

November 14, 2017.  At our October 31, 2017 monthly Chapter meeting, our guest speaker was Dr. Denis LeBlanc, president of Avenir Hearing, which operates 9 clinics in New Brunswick.  Dr. LeBlanc was invited to speak to us about an initiative he began four years ago in giving clients the option to rent their hearing aids, rather than buying them.

CIMG9502 Oct 31 2017 CHHA PEI meeting with Denis LeBlanc of Avenir Hearing

Dr. Denis LeBlanc at the October 31 CHHA PEI meeting in North Tryon. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

He explained that this option is available, through partnerships with other audiology clinics, in every province except Prince Edward Island.  Rentals are based on a three year plan, with all costs included (yes, even batteries), and then can be renewed with new hearing aids.

Several benefits to this option were outlined:

  • Affordability. As we know, hearing aids are expensive, and this is a way to pro-rate the cost over a three year period.
  • It’s an easy way to get into hearing aids. On average, he explained that it takes a person who has been diagnosed with hearing loss up to 7 years to actually purchase a hearing aid.  That’s 7 years of missing out on conversations!
  • People love the idea of updating technology every three years. With the rapid changes in technology, hearing aid companies update their circuitry about every 18 months.  If you have an older hearing aid, you may be missing out on some advances that will help improve your ability to hear.
  • People have complete peace of mind as they know what their monthly cost will be. There are no extra charges.

We asked him how popular the program was in New Brunswick, and were astounded to learn that 75% of private paying patients take this option. Those with private health insurance can also access the plan, with Dr. LeBlanc mentioning agreements with Johnson, Blue Cross, and Sun Life, in response to specific questions with those insurers.

There are three categories of hearing aid rentals, with three different monthly price points, based on what the client’s needs are:

Basic – for one-on-one conversations, TV and telephone use, and light ambient noise such as quiet household activities.  So, if you live in a quiet environment and don’t get out into the public much, this may be the option for you.

Standard – for those who go out to restaurants and social events, want to understand passengers while driving in a car, and moderate ambient noise such as attending meetings at work.  So, if you are more social or work, this option may be more suitable.

Select – for those who are out in crowds and public places, listening to music, and loud ambient noise.

Dr. LeBlanc was then asked what happens to the hearing aids after the three years are up.  We were pleased to learn that they are not thrown out, but refurbished and donated to a charitable organization, to help people with hearing loss in developing countries.

When asked the closest location to Prince Edward Island, for anyone wishing to go to New Brunswick for their hearing aids, he noted that while Shediac was the closest location, there were two additional offices in the vicinity, one in Dieppe, and one in Moncton.

For more information on the hearing aid rental program, see: http://www.hearingaidrental.ca/

For more information on Avenir Hearing, see: http://www.avenirhearing.ca/

Next meeting: Our next meeting will be on Tuesday, November 28, 2017, starting at 9:30 am, at the North Tryon Presbyterian Church.

Do you have a tip or story to share about hearing loss, or living with someone who is hard of hearing?  Do you rent your hearing aids?  Would you consider this option?  Let us know!  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

© Daria Valkenburg

 

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The ‘Pardon Me, What Did You Say?’ Roadshow At Andrews of Stratford

November 10, 2017.  On October 23, 2017, the ‘Pardon Me, What Did You Say?’ roadshow of presentations on tips for better communication with the hard of hearing continued.  After giving successful presentations at two Women’s Institute Fall Rallies (about 165 women in total), we were invited to Andrews of Stratford, a seniors home that offers independent living, community care, and nursing care options.

IMG_1909 Oct 23 2017 Andrews Lodge Stratford Brenda begins presentation

Brenda Porter addresses audience at Andrews of Stratford. (Photo credit: Annie Lee MacDonald)

30 participants came out to the presentation, which was open to the public, and we received 24 evaluations back.  This time the audience included both men and women.  As with the other two presentations made, all the evaluations were positive.  18 participants identified as hard of hearing (75%), 6 not, not a surprising result in a seniors home.  14 (58%) noted that they had close friends or family members who were hard of hearing.

One of the questions asked in the evaluations is ‘How involved are you now socially – with family, friends in the community?’, and people had the option of answering Rarely’, ‘Sometimes’, ‘Often, or ‘Frequently. We had expected that most people who came out to the presentations across the island would answer ‘Often’ or ‘Frequently’, as we didn’t expect too many people who were socially isolated would come out to a public presentation.  Instead, we hoped friends or family members would come in search of some tips to help their loved ones.

So we were both surprised and pleased that 2 people reported that they rarely socialized, and 6 said they sometimes socialized.  Why were we pleased?  If people who were socially isolated, or heading in that direction, came to the presentation, it suggested they wanted to be more social and were looking for ways to do so. In this instance those 8 people represented 33% of our audience.

IMG_1907 Oct 23 2017 Annie Lee Debra Nancy Brenda at Andrews Lodge Stratford

CHHA PEI members who helped out at the Andrews of Stratford presentation. Left to right: Annie Lee MacDonald, Debra Leuty, Nancy MacPhee, Brenda Porter. (Photo credit: Gerry Gray)

Comments in the evaluations included:

  • Very helpful and encouraging. Thank you.
  • Fantastic presentation.
  • Can identify with some difficulties and solutions to solve problems, and hope to use some.
  • I wish all presentations, sermons, etc, were as clear as yours was. (A comment about the sound system used)
  • The simplicity of the presentation made it all seem so easy.
  • I think sometimes we try to hide that we do not hear.
  • I am very deaf. My father was totally, mother about 8%, and siblings in varying stages.
  • Our dining room is extremely noisy so I miss conversation.

One of the questions asked was whether people wanted to be contacted for a follow-up to the presentation.  18 answered yes and provided contact details.

The booklet is funded in part by the Government of Canada’s New Horizons For Seniors Program, was written by members of CHHA PEI, and illustrated by artist Wayne Wright.

A few more presentations are coming up on the island.  Don’t miss out!

  • November 15 at 2 pm – Seniors Club in North Rustico
  • November 20 at 1:30 pm – Arts and Heritage Centre in Alberton
  • November 27 at 2 pm – West River United Church in Cornwall

Do you have a tip or story to share about hearing loss, or living with someone who is hard of hearing?  Let us know!  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

© Daria Valkenburg

 

 

Successful ‘Demystifying Cochlear Implants’ Seminar In Charlottetown

November 5, 2017.  On October 14, 2017 CHHA PEI hosted a seminar presented by Dr. David Morris of Halifax, entitled ‘Demystifying Cochlear Implants’.  Dr. Morris gave an engaging and informative session, taking us through the basic principles of cochlear implants, how this technology began and evolved, and how a modern cochlear implant looks like today.

CIMG9432 Oct 14 2017 CI Seminar Ctown during seminar

Dr. David Morris at the lecturn. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

He also discussed the criteria for being a candidate for cochlear implant surgery, and how a person is evaluated. Some of the criteria include:

For adults (18 years and older):

  • Must have severe to profound hearing loss in both ears
  • Do not benefit from hearing aids.
  • Are post-lingually deafened (in other words, you once had hearing and heard speech)
  • What is the cause of the hearing loss
  • What is the commitment to follow-up care

For children (12 months and older):

  • Must have a profound hearing loss in both ears
  • Do not benefit from hearing aids
  • What is the cause of the hearing loss
  • What is the child’s educational placement
  • What is the family’s commitment to follow-up care

We then were taken on a brief ‘tour’ of the surgical process.  You sure need a steady hand to do this type of surgery!

The afternoon session included a panel discussion in which Dr. Morris asked two participants specific questions on their surgical experience and life before and after the surgery. This was fascinating for all participants.

The seminar ended with a final question and answer session.  Many of the questions had been submitted ahead of time and were answered during the day, making for a very informative event tailored to the audience.

Participants included those with cochlear implants, those on the road to a cochlear implant or on the waiting list for one, and supportive family members.

Besides Dr. Morris, we were joined by two sponsors, both firms who supply cochlear implants:  MED-EL and Cochlear Canada Inc., who were kept busy answering questions and providing information. Three other sponsors, Prince Edward Island Seniors Secretariat, Better Hearing Solutions, and ALDS, helped make this session affordable.  Tim Hortons provided us with coffee.

We thank all of our sponsors for their support.  Without it, we would not be able to have provided real time captioning.  It was the cost of real time captioning that made this an expensive seminar, but a cost that made it possible for everyone to participate, no matter what their level of hearing ability.

CIMG9440 Oct 14 2017 CI Seminar Ctown Arturo of Cochlear Canada

Arturo Madrid-Zazueta, Area Manager of Cochlear Canada Inc. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

CIMG9438 Oct 14 2017 CI Seminar Ctown Jodi and Evelyn of MEDEL

Dr. Jodi Ostroff, Clinical Account Manager for Canada of MED-EL on left, and Beverley Elwell of the patient support team, on right. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Please visit our sponsors’ visit to learn more about the awesome work they do in providing products, research, and information of interest to those who have hearing loss.

Cochlear Canada Inc: www.cochlear.com

MED-EL: www.medel.com and you can visit their blog at https://blog.medel.com/

Better Hearing Solutions:  www.betterhearingsolutions.ca and you can also visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/BetterHearingSolutions

ALDS: www.alds.com

PEI Seniors Secretariat: https://www.princeedwardisland.ca/en/information/executive-council-office/seniors-secretariat

The evaluations from this session were extremely positive, and provided great information for us as a Chapter and for Dr. Morris in his practice.  A sample of the many comments and suggestions is listed here:

  • Can we find an audiologist on PEI who has an interest in cochlear implants?
  • I really appreciate the work of the organizers and Dr. Morris for coming to speak to us.
  • Very well organized and an informative day. Thank you.
  • The presenter was excellent. It gives me a better understanding about cochlear implants.
  • So grateful for all the information. Enjoyed the presentation very much.
  • Happy to see the captioning.
CIMG9444 Oct 14 2017 CI Seminar Ctown Dr Morris Louisa Sabine Alma Roger Curtiss

Back row, left to right: Curtiss Allum, Dr. David Morris, Roger Baillie. Front row: CHHA PEI member Alma Nunn with Dr Moriss’s daughters Louisa and Sabine. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

If you have a cochlear implant, or are on the journey to one, or are a supportive family member, please share your experiences and stories, the questions and fears you may have had.  We welcome your input!  (See Calling Cochlear Implant Users)

Do you have a tip or story to share about hearing loss, or living with someone who is hard of hearing?  Let us know!  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

© Daria Valkenburg

 

The ‘Pardon Me What Did You Say?’ Roadshow In Charlottetown

November 3, 2017.  After a successful presentation of our newest publication, “Pardon Me, What Did You Say?  A Guide to Navigating in the Hard of Hearing World”, to 40 women at the Women’s Institute Fall Workshop at Sherbrooke Community Centre in Summerside, we gave a second presentation on October 17 at a Women’s Institute Fall Workshop in Charlottetown.  We were told 135 women were registered for this event.  I’m not sure if they all attended, only that we received feedback from 86 of them.

CIMG9448 Oct 17 2017 Annie Lee introduces Pardon Me Presentation at WI Wkshop Ctown

CHHA PEI President Annie Lee MacDonald introduces presenter Brenda Porter. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

Of the 86 women who returned an evaluation form, 29 (33.7%) identified as having hearing loss while 57 said they didn’t.  60 women (69.7%) indicated that they had someone close to them who was hard of hearing.

CIMG9453 Oct 17 2017 Brenda at Pardon Me Presentation at WI Wkshop Ctown

Brenda Porter addresses the women in Charlottetown. (Photo credit: Daria Valkenburg)

The feedback comments were all positive, and a few of them are included here:

  • Excellent information and very pleasantly presented.
  • Great tips to help a close friend – make me more mindful.
  • Tips were spot on.
  • Tips could help me teach nursing students.
  • This was very informative for hard of hearing people and also people with hearing who are communicating with hard of hearing people.
  • Very helpful presentation.
  • Very informative. Glad I came.
  • Quite informative tips that I know I will use as this past week I have been trying to get used to wearing a hearing aid.

One of the questions asked was whether people wanted to be contacted for a follow-up to the presentation.  39 (45%) answered yes and provided contact details.

The booklet is funded in part by the Government of Canada’s New Horizons For Seniors Program, was written by members of CHHA PEI, and illustrated by artist Wayne Wright.

A few more presentations are coming up on the island.  Don’t miss out!  Drop by one of them.

  • November 8 at 2 pm – Silver Threads Seniors’ Club in Souris
  • November 15 at 2 pm – Seniors Club in North Rustico
  • November 20 at 1:30 pm – Arts and Heritage Centre in Alberton
  • November 27 at 2 pm – West River United Church in Cornwall

Do you have a tip or story to share about hearing loss, or living with someone who is hard of hearing?  Let us know!  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

© Daria Valkenburg

More Tips On Enjoying A Restaurant Meal When You Are Hard of Hearing

October 26, 2017.  A few days ago, three of us who are hard of hearing went out for lunch in downtown Ottawa.  Lunch was fun, but the next challenge we faced was going out for dinner in Ottawa with more people.  Disaster or success?

We planned ahead by visiting the restaurant chosen, Graffiti’s in Kanata to see how accommodating the restaurant would be with four hard of hearing people at dinner.  What did we need?  A quiet spot, with good lighting so we could see each other, and the music turned down low.  We were offered a quiet spot in the back of the restaurant with good lighting and a promise to shut off the music in that section.  Better than we expected, so a reservation was made.

On the evening in question, our party of five arrived at the restaurant – 4 who are hard of hearing, 1 with normal hearing.  Take a look at the photo of the five of us.  What do you notice?  You probably spotted that we are in a booth, one of the first criteria for an enjoyable dinner when you are hard of hearing. As promised, the music in our section was shut off as soon as we chose our spot.

CIMG9500 Oct 25 2017 Pieter Daria Myrtle Jane Don at Graffitis in Kanata

Photo: Left to right: Pieter Valkenburg, Daria Valkenburg, Myrtle Barrett, Jane Scott, Don Gribble at Graffiti’s in Kanata.

We had a selection of booths to choose from, but found that this circular booth allowed everyone to see each other easily.  Although the photo shows all of us in the booth for the photo op, during dinner four of us were in the booth and one person opted to sit on a chair in front of the table.

You probably guessed that the two men sat near each other, to be able to have a side conversation on topics of interest to them. This allowed the women to have a side chat of their own, and no one had difficulty hearing due to the spaciousness of the booth.  Otherwise, only one person spoke at a time, so that everyone could follow the conversation.

The booth had a high side on three sides for a noise barrier and there were no tables directly in front of us.  This provided optimum quiet and allowed us to concentrate on the conversations.  The person with us who had normal hearing was very grateful that we didn’t have to talk loud in order to be heard.

We had a grand evening!  It was a success.  Do you have a tip or story to share about restaurant dining?  Let us know!  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

© Daria Valkenburg

 

Upcoming CHHA PEI Meeting on Renting Your Hearing Aids

October 24, 2017.  Are You Hard of Hearing?  Do You Need Hearing Aids?  Did you know you can rent them?

Last week, Annie Lee MacDonald and I were invited by Rheal Leger, President of CHHA Moncton, to a day of presentations at Hearing Health New Brunswick.  It was very interesting to learn more about the world of the hard of hearing, and to find out some of the programs and options that are offered in New Brunswick to people who are hard of hearing.

CIMG9457 Oct 20 2017 Daniel Simone Daria Rheal Annie Hearing Health NB Moncton

At Hearing Health NB in Moncton. Left to right: Daniel Mallet, Simone Leger, Daria Valkenburg, Annie Lee MacDonald, Rheal Leger.

One of these is the opportunity to rent your hearing aids.  Just as you might lease a car, you have an option to rent new hearing aids and have them replaced with new ones every three years.  We immediately invited someone from New Brunswick to our next CHHA PEI meeting to come and explain it to us.

So, if you need hearing aids, but are looking at different ways to pay for them, come out to learn about this affordable option and its details.  Don’t miss out on any chance to reconnect with those around you and the things you enjoy.

When:  Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Time:    9:30 to 11:30 am

Where: North Tryon Presbyterian Church

              21592 Trans Canada Hwy in North Tryon

Are you already renting your hearing aid? We’d love to hear about your experience.  Let us know!  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

 

© Daria Valkenburg

Enjoying a Restaurant Lunch When You Are Hard of Hearing

October 23, 2017.  I love to eat out, and while in Ottawa I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to enjoy lunch with two friends who also are hard of hearing.  Ottawa is a very busy city, even more so if you are downtown at lunchtime as we were. And if you choose a trendy but noisy restaurant like Baton Rouge, as we did, you may think you are on a path to a terrible experience where you can’t hear.

Not so.  Take a look at the photo of the three of us.  What do you notice?  If you spotted that we are in a booth, you’ve got the first criteria for an enjoyable lunch.

CIMG9468 Oct 23 2017 lunch at Baton Rouge Ottawa with Daria Caarole Jane

Left to right: Daria Valkenburg, Carole Willans, Jane Scott at Baton Rouge in Ottawa.

One side of the booth is by an aisle, which means very little distracting noise on that side, perfect for someone with a cochlear implant.

You may also have noticed that there is a divider between the booth and the one on the other side, with a large plant pot as an added sound barrier.

You can’t see it in the photo, but the floor is carpeted, so noise is muffled, and the aisles are wide enough that you would have to strain to hear the conversation held by the people in the booth opposite us.

The restaurant is lit well enough that we could see each other, making it easier to follow the conversation flows.

The server knew we were hard of hearing and made sure she looked at us when speaking, making it unnecessary for us to say…… “Pardon me, what did you say?”

And all three of us sat in spots so that our good ears were focused on each other.

So, go out and enjoy those restaurant meals!  We did!  Do you have a tip or story to share about restaurant dining?  Let us know!  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

© Daria Valkenburg

 

How Well Do You Hear?

October 21, 2017.  The other day I heard that it takes, on average, 7 years for someone who has been diagnosed with hearing loss to do something about it.  It’s strange, in a way.  If you can’t see well, you go to an optometrist and have an eye test.  Depending on the outcome, you likely will purchase glasses or contacts.  Would you wait 7 years?  Unlikely.

What if you have a toothache?  Would you go to the dentist?  Or hope that it will magically go away? OK, maybe that’s not a good example.  I don’t like going to the dentist, so I might wait…..but not 7 years.

A snowbird friend of mine has a medical condition that affects her balance.  She’s supposed to use a rollator to keep her stable and reduce the risk of falls.  A very proud woman, she refuses to let anyone see her with a rollator or a cane, so it is only used in her apartment.  “It makes me look old” she said.  Well, she is of ‘a certain age’, but it’s the lurching about unsteadily that gives the appearance of being aged.  “It makes me look like I have a disability” was another reason she gave.

The end result?  She stopped going out.  She stopped going on holidays, including a winter holiday.  She stays in most of the time, except on special occasions to see her family.  Most of the time, her family must go to her.  This would be OK if she was happy, but she’s not.  She’s miserable and is somehow unable to accept that the world as she knew it has changed forever.

I thought of her when I read the article ‘Hear me out: Why people avoid checking out hearing loss’ by Dr. Gifford-Jones, about his own experience in coming to terms with his hearing loss, that was recently in newspapers.  If you missed it, here, courtesy of Jane Scott, is the link: http://chealth.canoe.com/news/chealth/35152?newssource=0

The sad reality is that over the years we will all have challenges that affect our lives.  Whether we have hearing loss, vision loss, or have to walk with a cane or be in a wheelchair, it’s how we deal with the challenge that determines how others perceive us.

Composer Ludwig van Beethoven started losing his hearing in 1798.  By 1801, at age 31, he had lost 60% of his hearing.  Of course, like many of us, he tried to keep it secret.  A composer who can’t hear his own compositions?  Who would take him seriously?  His career would be over! He once wrote to an acquaintance that he avoided social gatherings for two years, because he couldn’t bring himself to let anyone know about his condition.

As his hearing deteriorated, his compositions changed too.  He composed using lower notes that he could still hear.  Have you heard his ‘Moonlight Sonata’? (See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVARN4_GcS4).  Did you know that he also wrote an opera and 6 symphonies while he still had limited hearing?

By 1816 he was completely deaf.  Did it stop him composing?  No.  Whether you like classical music or not, his 9th Symphony, better known as ‘Ode To Joy’, is familiar to almost everyone.  By the time this symphony was written, Beethoven had accepted his condition and returned to using higher notes in his compositions, imagining how they might sound.  When the composition, which he conducted, premiered on May 7, 1824, he had to be turned towards the audience so he could see people applauding. He couldn’t hear them.  (See  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFX8S9aAgvw )

We can’t fool anyone that we can hear when we can’t.   A few weeks ago, Annie Lee MacDonald and I heard an ENT doctor give a presentation at a conference.  In trying to explain the differences between normal hearing, mild hearing loss, severe hearing loss, etc., he showed a cartoon that got everyone’s attention.  See for yourself in this brief Flintstones video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TD5E88fFnxE&feature=youtu.be

So, why is it that we resist getting help to improve our hearing?  Is it the cost?  The perceived stigma?  Do we think it’s a temporary condition that will go away?  I don’t know the answer, and maybe the answer is different for all of us.

Do you have a tip or story to share?  Let us know!  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

 © Daria Valkenburg

 

Two Stories From ‘Pardon Me, What Did You Say?’

October 15, 2017.  Funded in part by the Government of Canada’s New Horizons for Seniors Program, and written by Chapter members, the large-print booklet “Pardon Me, What Did You Say?  A Guide to Navigating in the Hard of Hearing World” is designed to help improve communications between hard of hearing seniors and their family, friends, and caregivers.

NHSP Booklet Front & Back

Artist Wayne Wright, whose cartoons are in The Journal Pioneer, volunteered his time and considerable artistic talent to illustrate the personal stories in the booklet, after Annie Lee MacDonald asked for his help.

IMG_1769 Aug 18 2017 Wayne Wright in Summerside

Artist Wayne Wright signs the illustrations for the booklet. (Photo credit: Annie Lee MacDonald)

How many of you can relate to this story from the booklet?  ….Not long ago, my husband (AKA “my ears”) and I travelled by plane together.  The so-called public announcements at the airport and on the plane are an exercise in frustration for me.  When queried, my husband, who quietly reads while I fuss and fume, said “Ignore it.  No one understands what they say on those announcements.”…..

CHHA PEI W Wright Illustration P

The airport announcement story was illustrated by artist Wayne Wright.

Would you be embarrassed if this story from the booklet happened to you? ….. One time, at an airport hotel, I requested a wake-up call so I could catch an early morning flight.  Unfortunately I slept in and didn’t hear the phone ringing.  When I didn’t answer after several tries, the hotel staff came banging on the door.  I didn’t hear that, either.  Finally, they opened the door with a master key and woke me up.  If I hadn’t let them know I was hard of hearing when I checked in, I don’t know what they would have done!  Luckily, I made my plane connection on time!

 CHHA PEI W Wright Illustration T

The sleeping in story was illustrated by artist Wayne Wright.

Do you have a tip or story of your own to share?  Have you read the booklet?  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

© Daria Valkenburg

Positive Reception to Booklet On Improving Communications with Hard of Hearing

October 15, 2017. On October 11, 2017, the first official presentation introducing our Chapter’s newest publication, “Pardon Me, What Did You Say?  A Guide to Navigating in the Hard of Hearing World” was held at Stratford Community Centre, as part of the Women’s Institute Fall Workshop.  Over 40 women heard the presentation by Brenda Porter, and received copies of the booklet.  Based on the comments and evaluations, this was positively received, with many saying “how I wish I’d known this information before”.

IMG_0149 Oct 10 2017 Brenda Porter by slideshow presentation at Stratford CC

Brenda Porter during the presentation introducing the publication Pardon Me, What Did You Say? A Guide to Navigating in the Hard of Hearing World” at Sherbrooke Community Centre in Summerside. (Photo credit: Gerry Gray)

Besides giving presentations, the Chapter has begun publicizing the booklet, which was funded in part by the Government of Canada’s New Horizons for Seniors Program, at conferences. Annie Lee MacDonald and Daria Valkenburg were invited to showcase the booklet at a booth at the “Making the Connection Conference” in Summerside, a conference with 200 participants that focused on the care of older adults.  Participants from long term care, community care facilities, hospitals, and home care that included nurses, occupational therapists, physical therapists, physicians, administrators, and social workers gave a positive response to the booklet.

NHSP Booklet Front & Back

Copies of the booklet were also given to participants at the October 14, 2017 seminar ‘Demystifying Cochlear Implants’, with copies given to Dr. David Morris and his staff at the Maritime Lateral Skull Base Clinic in Halifax, where many islanders go for treatment related to their ears, as well as to seminar sponsors present at the event.

 Additional presentations are booked for November as follows:

  • Charlottetown Seniors Active Living Centre – Wednesday, Nov. 1, 10:30 am
  • Souris Silver Threads Seniors Club – Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2:00 pm
  • North Rustico Seniors’ Club – Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2:00 pm
  • Alberton Arts and Heritage Centre – Monday, Nov. 20, 1:30 pm
  • Cornwall West River United Church – Monday, Nov. 27, 2:00 pm

At the request of PEI’s Seniors’ Secretariat, Chapter members will be answering questions about the booklet on November 22 during the Secretariat’s ‘PEI Party Line’.  Never heard of the PEI Party Line?  It’s a free, telephone-based program that offers information and a chance to talk with others. Each week, a 45-minute telephone call, between 10:00 am and 10:45 am, is hosted with different topics and guest speakers.

Do you have a tip or story to share?  Have you read the booklet?  Comments can be made on this blog, or you can email us at hearpei@gmail.com.

© Daria Valkenburg